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*Note* This scheduling program was not designed by folks who do a lot with APA Style and unfortunately it defaults to listing authors in alphabetical order. We cannot fix this for this online schedule, but the author orders are posted in the order submitted in the printed program available via pdf here.

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Poster [clear filter]
Friday, March 6
 

1:05pm

A pilot intervention to promote psychosocial health and empowerment among female commercial sex workers in Kathmandu, Nepal: Program feasibility and impact on peer educators
Female commercial sex workers (FCSWs) in Kathmandu are vulnerable to an array of occupational risks, including various reproductive and sexual health hazards, unsafe and unstable working conditions, and numerous forms of violence, harassment and exploitation (National Centre for AIDS and STD Control, 2011). These challenging circumstances compromise the psychosocial health and empowerment of FCSWs, which in turn affects their ability to protect themselves from future harms. Peer education programs have been established as an effective method for reaching FCSWs (Medley, Kennedy, O’Reilly, & Sweat, 2009), but have not yet been tested as a means to promote psychosocial health. The present study piloted a brief peer education intervention in collaboration with a non-governmental organization (NGO) to empower and promote the psychosocial health of FCSWs in Kathmandu, Nepal. Ten women were trained as peer educators and, through formal and informal teaching opportunities, reached over 140 FCSWs with psychosocial health messages. Pre, post, and follow-up surveys were administered to the peer educators to assess the potential impact of the program on empowerment, psychosocial health, and peer education efficacy. Additionally, exit interviews were conducted with the peer educators to collect in-depth feedback regarding their training and teaching experiences. Two NGO field staff observed and commented on peer educator teaching competency and were also interviewed about the program. According to preliminary survey results, the peer educators reported an increase in three forms of empowerment—within, with others, and over resources, decreased shame and burnout, and increased happiness and efficacy to teach, communicate, lead and help others. NGO staff observed increased teaching competency across time. Exit interviews suggested additional program impacts, including increased self-realization and self-care and positive dispositional and relationship changes. Overall, findings suggest that peer education methods are a feasible and promising means to enhance the psychosocial health and empowerment of FCSWs.


Friday March 6, 2015 1:05pm - 2:05pm
Redwood

1:05pm

Experiences of Microaggressions in the Lives of Student Women of Color
This paper presents findings from a qualitative study focused on microaggressions sustained by underrepresented women on a college campus. Microagressions are described as “brief, everyday exchanges that send denigrating messages to certain individuals because of their group membership” (Sue et al., 2007). Previous research on microaggressions has been conducted using primarily samples of student of color in larger university settings. In the current study, researchers aimed to investigate the nature and extent of microaggressions experiences shared by women of color in a small liberal arts college environment, an exclusive population that researchers have not yet targeted. Based on previous literature, the investigators expected to find that the majority of participants would share detailed accounts regarding their experiences of certain types of microaggressions. The researchers targeted respondents who self-identified as women of color and specifically invited them to participate in discussion groups. Using a semi-structured guide, facilitators (also self-identified women of color) conducted three focus groups composed of a total of ten women. Data were transcribed and loaded into an extensive data coding and analysis online application. Using a coding guide composed of reliable identifiers based upon the related literature; the investigators tagged themes and, through a reiterative process, identified consistent, emerging thematic patterns found in the narratives. Researchers found most of the expected microaggressive themes. Moore importantly, these collective narratives suggested an ethos of [defending one another] and other significant themes that may be salient to women of color on a residential campus inhabited by a predominantly White student body. In future studies, the researchers will use individual interviews to further investigate the use of support systems and coping mechanisms. These investigations will help to extend the perspective on these experiences and pave the way for future examinations, thereby contributing to the newly emerging existing research within the field


Friday March 6, 2015 1:05pm - 2:05pm
Redwood

1:05pm

Female Psychologists and the Restorative Justice Process
Restorative justice is an integral part of restoring individuals, families and communities. A crucial part of the restoring process is the involvement of mental health professionals. The current climate in the criminal justice environment lends itself to using more punitive measures before considering rehabilitating offenders. With the increasing number of offenders in jails and correctional facilities, many professionals in the criminal justice system are realizing that punitive measures are no longer effective to correct behavior. As a result, researchers and clinicians alike are searching for solutions to decrease the numbers of offenders in the system and decrease the rate of recidivism upon release. Providing holistic treatment from competent mental health professionals can be an integral part of the restorative justice process. Within this context, female psychologists can provide treatment to families and offenders while also being an advocate for the restorative justice system. Female psychologists and other female mental health professionals have a specific voice and offer many valuable attributes to the treatment process. Specifically, treatment of the offenders will be enhanced through the use of positive psychology through a feminist lens. As women are often the victims in restorative justice situations, intentionally having women as a part of the restorative process can bring healing not only to the offender, but also to the victim and the community as a whole. This paper will focus on the various types of treatments that can be used to treat offenders while still being supportive of the victim and their family, as well as providing healing to the community at large. Several modalities including solution-focused brief therapy, substance abuse treatment and drug court have been posited to be effective in treating offenders and will be examined further.


Friday March 6, 2015 1:05pm - 2:05pm
Redwood

1:05pm

Gathering the Campus Community: A Collective Response to Violence
Transformative justice says individual justice and collective liberation are equally important, mutually supportive, and inexorably intertwined. The success of one is impossible without the success of the other. Movements that use transformative justice present us with a model to heal the trauma of violence (whatever that might be), reduce the level of assaults we experience and mobilize masses of people. A month after Michael Brown’s death in Ferguson, a small group of community members gathered at the University of Utah. The group was disappointed at the minimal response to the tragedy observed in the community. Just days before, a young man Darrien Hunt was shot six times in the back by police in Saratoga Springs, Utah. Again, our campus community fell silent. As the group spoke, we identified a need for collaboration in our school responses to violence—a shift to a culture of collective accountability. To this end, we propose creative responses to social injustice that do not rely on current state systems. We believe this is a liberating process that creates a space for healing and transformation. Through our discussions, we identified a need for a phone alert system that prompts action when violence occurs in our communities. It is our hope that by creating an avenue for people to connect, our campus will have more effective responses to oppression, discrimination, and violence. This poster details our process of planning this community action project. It highlights the feminist principles we use, such as attending to the process, resisting hierarchy, and acknowledging privilege’s role in violence. All involved in the project are agents of change to end violence. Starting with the communities in which we are part of, we hope to be part of a larger transformation of state systems, refocusing the importance of community-centered responses to violence.


Friday March 6, 2015 1:05pm - 2:05pm
Redwood

1:05pm

Group Art Therapy with Juvenile Offenders
The purpose of this research is to explore the integration of restorative justice approaches with adolescents in the juvenile justice system using a 12-week Art Therapy program. Restorative processes bring those harmed by crime or conflict, and those responsible for the harm, into communication, enabling everyone affected by a particular incident to play a part in repairing the harm and finding a positive way forward. (Restorative Justice Council, 2013). Restorative justice is essential in the process of understanding the impact and consequences of behavior. Recent studies (Rodriguez, 2007; Schwalbe & Gearing & MacKenzie & Brewer & Ibrahim, 2012) indicate that restorative justice approaches are effective in reducing recidivism rates and victim empathy. The goal is to integrate Art Therapy services as an integral part of treating adolescents that are experiencing symptoms of anxiety and depression. The Art Therapy program intends to decrease symptoms of anxiety and depression so that the adolescent can be more engaged in the community which overall aims to prevent recidivism. Art Therapy can help to visualize concepts that may contribute to the participants’ understanding of the past behavioral experiences and deepen the meaning they derive from their crimes. It is the intention of this research to bridge the gap between using art therapy and restorative justice in the treatment of juvenile offenders and provide valuable information to the Art Therapy field. Research continues to show the effectiveness of group art therapy and has been correlated with reduced rates of depression and other symptomology, as well behavioral modification (Erickson & Young, 2010; Gussak, 2006; Gussak, 2009a; Gussak, 2009b; Meekums & Daniel, 2011; Smeijsters & eleven, 2006). Though researchers have spent time investigating the effectiveness of art therapy with criminal populations, a deficit in research was found that incorporated art therapy, restorative justice, and early interventions with juveniles offenders.


Friday March 6, 2015 1:05pm - 2:05pm
Redwood

1:05pm

Racializing Embodiment of Female Immigrants
By the year 2012, approximately more than forty million individuals residing in the United States were immigrants and 11.4 million of them were undocumented (DHA, 2012; MPI, n.d.). According to existing scholarly literature, the general public holds varying degrees of positions and attitudes towards immigrants depending on their legal status (Murray & Marx, 2013; Yakushko, 2009), ethnic origin (Hitlan, Carrillo, & Aikman, 2007), and language abilities (Newman, Hartman, & Taber, 2012). Immigrant women have been stereotyped as uneducated, passive (Hallak & Quina, 2004), exotic, subservient, and model minority, among many other sterotypes (Tummala-Nara, 2013; Yakushko & Espin, 2010). The proposed paper will focus on female immigrants and will present the concept of racializing embodiment (Hook, 2008) as an alternative paradigm in the discussion on existing biases towards female immigrant population in the United States. The paper will provide a brief overview of the theories regarding various forms of gender related bias, including prejudice and stereotypes (Fiske, 2010) as well as extend these theories toward understanding experiences of female immigrants through the post-colonial concept of racializing embodiment (Hook, 2008). The term racializing will be used to refer to linguistically constructed interactive and communicative processes situated within dominant social, political, and cultural practices of the host society (LeCouteur & Augoustinos, 2001). The unconscious processes contributing to the process of racialization of female immigrants will be explored through the language of psychoanalysis and will illustrate how the unconscious placement of objectionable contents and prohibited desires creates a gendered racialized other (Hook, 2008; Hook, 2006; Hook & Truscott, 2013) and differences in gender embodiment within a host culture patriarchy (Hook, 2008). By deploying a psychoanalytic theory (Dalal, 2006; Hook, 2008), the role and impact of signifiers and embodiment of color in the process of racializing of female immigrants will be discussed. Moreover, the concept of abjection will be introduced as the way of understanding projection of simultaneously abhorred and desired contents into the racialized Other. The paper presentation will conclude with further research suggestions and implications for feminist post-colonial clinical practice, namely, scholarship that increases awareness into less visible social structures behind the racializing embodiment of female immigrants and studies that focus on the affective and pre-symbolic dimensions of racializing of immigrant women.


Friday March 6, 2015 1:05pm - 2:05pm
Redwood

1:05pm

Reporting sexual violence on campus: Restorative Justice as friend or foe?
Restorative Justice (RJ) principles lend themselves to their application in disciplinary proceedings on college campuses, particularly since both align well in the aim of fostering human, and in this case student, development. The ideal RJ processes are victim-empowering, dialogue-centered procedures, which focus on accountability and the reinforcement of values in their respective communities (United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, 2006). As more colleges implement RJ procedures, there is a scarcity of research of potential consequences for reporting serious misconduct, in particular sexual violence. Almost one in five college women will become the victim of sexual violence (Kilpatrick et al., 2007). Renewed focus in the issue by the White House has put the spotlight on colleges to increasingly prevent, investigate and deal with sexual violence on their campuses. In light of the fact that these cases are notoriously underreported at a rate of only around 5% (to both campus authorities as well as police), women apparently still perceive substantially more negative consequences than benefits to reporting (Fisher et al., 2003). The reasons for not reporting are most often cited as not wanting others to know about what happened/confidentiality and believing that the incident was not serious enough (Sable et al., 2006). It is unclear whether these concerns are affected by models of student conduct policies being traditional versus RJ. As promising as RJ principles may seem for fostering student development, effects on victims and communities need to be of primary concern. Without a thorough investigation of the potential effects, we run the risk of minimizing the incidents and deterring further from reporting instead of empowering the victim and preventing future sexual misconduct. This poster highlights the potential benefits as well as dangers of applying RJ processes to sexual violence cases on college campuses and calls for more focused research.

Speakers
HM

Heike Mitchell

University of Akron
IW

Ingrid Weigold

University of Akron


Friday March 6, 2015 1:05pm - 2:05pm
Redwood

1:05pm

Restorative Justice and Compassion-Based Practices with Inmates
There are different models of Restorative Justice, from group processes within a neighborhood to volunteering to teach restorative justice principles and practices within the confines of a prison setting. This presentation will serve to share about one way that restorative justice principles and practices have been taught to and facilitated with male inmates referred to as “lifers” and how it was done so in a feminist context and with the inclusion of compassion-based practices and role play. Examples will be given in regard to how three women volunteers ( a psychologist, a survivor of violence, and the sister of a murdered brother) facilitated restorative interaction with male inmates who had volunteered for a restorative justice workshop to address their crimes after having completed an Alternatives to Violence program. Implications for future endeavors with both male and female inmates and for those re-entering society will be discussed. The value of approaching the humanity of the survivor, perpetrator, and the systems in which they interact will also be discussed from a feminist perspective. A possible film clip will be included.


Friday March 6, 2015 1:05pm - 2:05pm
Redwood

1:05pm

The Impact of Stereotypes and Microaggressions on Mental Health of Ethnicity
The purpose of our study was to explore the experiences and impacts of microaggressions regarding ethnicity. Stereotypes greatly impact how people perceive others in society (Koenig & Eagly, 2014). The blatancy of their effects on people is well known and studied. Nevertheless, there are forms of discrimination that are not so openly studied (Smith, 2014; Koenig & Eagly, 2014). Microaggressions are a more subtle form of discrimination, which consists of unconscious behaviors that make people feel like the “other” group (Nadal, Griffin, Wong, Hamit & Rasmus, 2012). Microaggressions can be targeted in numerous ways, such as an individual’s ethnicity, gender, SES, and physical capability. Research has shown that microaggressions have an impact on mental health, depression and anxiety (Nadal et al., 2012). In order to address these various factors, it is critical to understand the common themes that arise from individuals who are being microaggressed regarding their ethnicity. Participants were students from a public university in Southern California who believed they were being impacted by microaggressions. Data was collected in the form of focus groups, with 4 groups in total. Participants were asked to discuss their experiences regarding the ethnic group they felt most microaggressed into by members outside of their group. Using qualitative procedures, date was analyzed to identify common themes of microaggressions. The results ascertained that participants displayed feelings of disconnect with their own identities. The findings can help us further understand the effects microaggressions have on such populations, as well as to educate others about the long-term negative effects that manifest throughout their lives. References Koenig, A. M., & Eagly, A. H. (2014). Evidence for the social role theory of stereotype content: observations of groups’ roles shape stereotypes. Journal of Personality & Social Psychology, 107 (3), 371-392. Nadal L. Kevin, Griffin E. Katie, Wong Yinglee, Hamit Sahran, & Rasmus Morgan. (2012). The impact of racial microaggressions on mental health: counseling implications for clients of color, Journal of Counseling & Development, (92), 57-66. Smith, S. (2014). Limitations to equality: gender stereotypes and social change. Juncture, 21 (2), 144-150


Friday March 6, 2015 1:05pm - 2:05pm
Redwood

1:05pm

Understanding Latina Experience of Discrimination: Quantitative and Qualitative Approaches
Introduction Discrimination against Latinas/o in the U.S. in jobs, education, health care, and everyday life is a serious problem and has deleterious effects on Latina/o health and mental health. A number of predictors of discrimination have been identified, such as language, immigration status, socio-economic status, but few studies have examined Latina women and what variables may be uniquely associated with their perception discrimination. The purpose of this study is to 1) determine, quantitatively, the predictors of perception of discrimination among a sample of Latina college women, focusing on immigrant status, fear of deportation, acculturative stress, and social support; and 2) to investigate, through open-ended interviews, how Latinas explain, interpret, and cope with discrimination in their daily lives. Methods Participants were 107 Latina college students recruited through Internet solicitation to national immigrant student rights organizations, university student organizations, Craigslist, and other pertinent listservs in the Western, Southwestern, and Midwestern United States. Average age was 23.71, sd=4.72; 75% were born in the U.S.; of those born outside the U.S. 63% were born in Mexico. Each participant completed an online questionnaire that measured perception of discrimination, fear of deportation, acculturative stress, peer and family social support, and demographic items, such as age and whether born in the U.S. or not. A series of 6 interviews with Latina college students that investigates their experience of discrimination is underway, but have not yet been completed. However, the results of interviews will be included in the final presentation. Results Hierarchical multiple regression indicate that immigrant status, i.e., immigrant or U.S.-born, and acculturative stress were not significantly related to perception of discrimination; fear of deportation and social support were significantly related to perception of discrimination. The in-depth interviews will provide an interpretive framework for these results and for further understanding the experience of discrimination among Latina women. Discussion Social support appears to buffer against perception of discrimination, while fear of deportation leads a greater perception of discrimination among Latina college students. As the number of Latinas in higher education increases and as they enter the workforce in higher numbers, understanding what factors are related to perception of discrimination becomes vital. Furthermore, how Latinas may explain, experience, and cope with discrimination can provide insight into their vulnerability to discrimination, as well as their resilience and strength in the face of it.


Friday March 6, 2015 1:05pm - 2:05pm
Redwood