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*Note* This scheduling program was not designed by folks who do a lot with APA Style and unfortunately it defaults to listing authors in alphabetical order. We cannot fix this for this online schedule, but the author orders are posted in the order submitted in the printed program available via pdf here.

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Poster [clear filter]
Saturday, March 7
 

1:05pm

Culture, Body Size Discrepancy, and Disordered Eating Among Asian American Women
A community sample of 241 Asian American women (AAW) of varied immigration generational status participated in an online survey regarding their traditional cultural beliefs and disordered eating behaviors and attitudes. While there were no generational differences in their endorsement of traditional cultural beliefs, second-generation AAW reported significantly more disordered eating behaviors and attitudes compared to their first- and third and above-generation counterparts. The role of body size discrepancy (actual-ideal BMI) was explored, and it was found to be a much better predictor than actual BMI. After BMI was controlled, body size discrepancy was predictive of AAW’s Bulimia and Dieting disordered attitudes and behaviors, and compensatory behaviors when uncomfortably full, worry of losing control of how much food one eats, self-perception of being fat, and the feeling of food dominating life. Results of this study may suggest that BMI is less useful as a risk factor for many AA women, or that what mainstream researchers and clinicians consider to be normal weight may not be perceived as slim enough in the context of AA culture. Different patterns also emerged between the EAT-26 and SCOFF, two common instruments used to assess disordered eating behaviors and attitudes. Even though almost 90% of the women in this study were of normal or low weight according to US BMI standards, 7.5% of our sample was at risk for EDs using the EAT-26 criteria, and 21% using SCOFF. Endorsement of Family Recognition through Achievement was the only significant predictor in overall disordered eating assessed by SCOFF, and both the Dieting and Bulimia subscales of the EAT-26. In addition, participants were approximately 1.6 times more likely to endorse worrying about losing control over how much one eats (SCOFF 2) than were those who did not identify with family recognition through achievement. Clinical and research implications are discussed.


Saturday March 7, 2015 1:05pm - 2:05pm
Redwood

1:05pm

Disability and Multiple Sclerosis: Stigma, Outness, and Links with Psychological Well-Being
The present study tested the tenets of minority stress theory with a sample of 446 individuals living with Multiple Sclerosis (MS). The study extended prior bodies of research conducted with individuals who have concealable identities (e.g., LGBTQ) and the impact of distal and proximal minority stressors on mental health (Hatzenbuehler, 2009; Meyer, 2003). In this study, the mediating roles of two proximal minority stressors (stigma consciousness and disclosure/concealment of one’s ICI) on the link between a distal stressors (perceived social support and discrimination) with perceived well-being (PWB) will be examined. The authors hypothesize that perceived social support and outness each would be related positively with perceived well-being and negatively with psychological distress, and that stigma would be related negatively with psychological well-being and positively with psychological distress. The second set of hypotheses involved the mediation patterns proposed in the minority stress literature. Specifically, it is predicted that proximal or external minority stressors (i.e., expectations of stigma, and outness/concealment) would mediate the relations of the distal or internal stressor (i.e., perceived social support) with psychological well-being and psychological distress.


Saturday March 7, 2015 1:05pm - 2:05pm
Redwood

1:05pm

Experiencing Microaggressions: Women with Apparent and Nonapparent Disabilities
Microaggressions have been defined as verbal, behavioral, or environmental slights or insults that communicate a derogatory message to the recipient. Despite the growing body of research on the effects of microaggressions based on race/ ethnicity and sexual orientation, there are only two studies on microaggressions against people with disabilities. This is the third such study, which focuses on the specific experiences of women who have disabilities visible to others, and women who have a nonapparent disabilities. Through focus groups and an online survey, we explored these women's experiences of microaggressions in various domains of life, based on the previous work of Keller & Galgay (2010) with both men and women.


Saturday March 7, 2015 1:05pm - 2:05pm
Redwood

1:05pm

Food Allergies Summer Camp
One out of every thirteen children will experience a food allergy reaction during their childhood. This equates to roughly two children in each classroom. Of those, 25 percent will experience a severe anaphylactic reaction; this means one person experiences anaphylactic shock every six minutes. Fear, anxiety, and depression are common symptoms of living with food allergies. To date, the focus of the research has been on curing food allergies, rather than living with a food allergy. Allergies are the new excuse to segregate. Protocol, or standards of practice, in some cases are to discriminate or separate by having a designated food allergy table. Shemesh, et al (2012) found that 31.5 percent of children in their study were bullied due to their food allergy. Of those children bullied, 80 percent of the offenders were fellow classmates threatening contact with the problematic food. Societies are beginning to realize that they are creating communities of children without a voice. These children have been marginalized and have not experienced normalcy. Many of these children live in states of heightened awareness and isolation. West, Denzer, Wildman, and Anhalt (2013), learned that although a majority of teachers felt they possessed sufficient knowledge of food allergies, they feel burdened to accommodate the children’s needs. A response to segregation is to offer children with food allergies a new experience. Camp Blue Spruce was created two years ago for this specific purpose. Data was collected on the impact this camp has on the mental health of its participants. Neuroscience has established that a positive camping experience helps children’s developing brains (Bryson, 2014). This poster highlights how inclusive camp models serve as a restorative practice for children with severe food allergies.


Saturday March 7, 2015 1:05pm - 2:05pm
Redwood

1:05pm

Gender and Psychiatric Drug Prescriptions among Intellectually Disabled Individuals
The general use of psychopharmacological methods in America has been increasing over the last decade (Medco, 2011). Within the population of intellectually disabled (ID) individuals, the use of psychotropic medications has been used for those with psychological disabilities, but also as a means to subdue those who were merely difficult to manage (Tsiouris, Kim, Brown, Pettinger, & Cohen, 2012). Additional factors may also increase the use of psychotropic medications. For example, gender has often been found to influence the diagnosis, treatment, and medication of psychiatric disabilities (Bentley, 2005; Medco, 2011; Smith, 2010). The Department of Developmental Services (DDS) assists ID individuals and their families using various methods. One such method is support via assisted living residences. Within the population of those living in either state- or privately-run homes and who are taking advantage of DDS services, we examined how patterns of medication prescription according to race and gender are indicative—or not—of the US population at large. This paper is part of a larger research project examining the relationships between race, gender, and medication prescription; medications include antipsychotics, antidepressants, and anti-anxiety medications, and all prescription values refer to the quantity of drugs prescribed, but not the prescribed dosages. This presentation will focus on the findings regarding how gender appears to be related to the number of medication prescriptions within the population of ID individuals in DDS homes in Connecticut in 2013 (n = 16,694). In addition, gender can be examined with regard to only those prescribed medications. While the majority of the population was not prescribed medication, chi square analyses point to significant relationships between gender and prescriptions for antipsychotics, antidepressants, and antianxiety medications, but not for anti-mania medications or sedatives. This knowledge will help advocates better serve the ID community.


Saturday March 7, 2015 1:05pm - 2:05pm
Redwood

1:05pm

Gendering revolt: Understanding women's constructions of 'dirty' and 'disgusting' bodies
When thinking about the term “revolting,” two different ideologies are: first, something disgusting or dirty; second, something rebellious and unsettling. This project seeks to look at both iterations of revolt by examining disgust and the potential ways that bodies can be rebellious, disobedient, and disorderly. When thinking more closely about disgust, it is clear that disgust is a prevalent and bodily visceral emotion; it also drives much of what we consider to be morally problematic or revolting, and as such, has great relevance to intersections with women and gender studies research. For this poster presentation, I will be presenting the qualitative data of a research study that was conducted by Dr. Breanne Fahs during the fall of 2014 on women’s beliefs and practices about women’s bodies and sexualities. Within this study, twenty women of different racial backgrounds and sexual orientations with ages ranging from 18-59 were asked several questions pertaining to disgust towards their own bodies and disgust towards the “Othered” body. A qualitative thematic analysis from a feminist poststructuralist framework was applied to the data. Results showed that women’s ideologies about their own bodies were directed to sites of excess (i.e., fatness) while other women’s bodies were framed in more racialized and gendered ways. Through a moral perspective, people who inhabit an “Othered” body have been labeled as “bad” or “unclean” people. The social justice implications of these findings deserve more close attention, particularly in terms of how a feminist politics might understand and utilize notions of disgust to advance a more egalitarian, progressive, or even radical agenda in the world of identity and body politics. With clear notions of “likeable” or “preferred” body types, those who are placed in the disgust category are the body types—and, in a broader sense, the people--that become oppressed and marginalized.


Saturday March 7, 2015 1:05pm - 2:05pm
Redwood

1:05pm

Moving Disability from the Margins: The Representation of Disability in Psychology of Women Textbooks
Scholars have analyzed representations of people with disabilities in diverse media from fairy tales (Franks, 2001) to textbooks (Goldstein, Siegel, & Seaman, 2010). When present in media, disability is often depicted solely as a medical issue with little focus on social dimensions of this axis of diversity, identity, and marginalization. Prompted by calls for the integration of disability into psychology and psychology of women (Asch & McCarthy, 2002; Banks, 2010; Olkin, 2014a), this paper presents a qualitative content analysis of 15 psychology of women/gender textbooks to determine what representations of disability are present and whether these texts provide more positive depictions and discourses with regard to disability when compared to other studies. Our analysis found a focus on physical disabilities discussed mainly in chapters on mental and physical health often conforming to a social model of disability. We conclude with how disability studies might enhance psychology of women courses, particularly discussions of mental health, and topic areas that may require supplemental materials provided by instructors.


Saturday March 7, 2015 1:05pm - 2:05pm
Redwood

1:05pm

Problematizing (the lack of) eating disorders research exploring diversity: A critical review
Although the eating disorders (ED) field boasts an expansive body of literature, relatively few studies have centered on the experiences of diverse groups. Of the extant research exploring EDs among women with diverse backgrounds/identities, there has been a predominant focus on ethnic and racial diversity, while other groups such as the lesbian, bisexual and transgender communities, women with disabilities, women from less privileged socioeconomic backgrounds, and mid-life and older women have been largely excluded. Broadly speaking, research exploring EDs has been primarily focused on women of European descent (Talleyrand, 2012). In addition, the extant literature in this area is mixed, with some studies providing evidence of the increasing prevalence rates of EDs among minority women (e.g., Franko et al., 2012), and others pointing to the protective factors inherent in certain minority cultures against the development of EDs (e.g., Warren et al., 2001). Nonetheless, it appears as though EDs are no longer “just a white girl’s thing” (Bordo, 2009). Findings from recent research suggest that EDs are affecting the lives of women from increasingly diverse backgrounds, including those identifying with racial, ethnic, sexual, and religious minority identities (e.g., Clark & Winterowd, 2012; Feldman & Meyer, 2007; Forbes et al., 2012). However, there continues to be a relative paucity of literature addressing the experiences of diverse women living with eating challenges. As such, the current project includes a comprehensive review of the extant literature exploring diversity among women living with EDs. Specific areas of diversity that continue to require further attention in ED research will be identified. Lastly, a qualitative analysis of the last five years of published ED research will be executed in order to ascertain the prevalence of diverse women’s participation in ED research. Detailed information will be provided on the methodology utilized to identify relevant articles for this project.


Saturday March 7, 2015 1:05pm - 2:05pm
Redwood

1:05pm

Subcultured, Racialized, and Marginalized: The Thing that Binds you! LGBTQQII Women of Color
Women of color who are Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Questioning, and Intersex, (WOCLGBTQQII) are subject to the imposed worldview and are Subcultured, Racialized, and Marginalized within the culturally hegemonic workforce. Current research reveals that gender, sexual orientation, and race intersect with and are subject to consistent stigmatization in the heteronormative workplace. The WOCLGBTQQII populations are disproportionately burdened with workplace Stereotype Threat, pink ceiling barriers, hostilities, and systemic oppressions that limit their career options. Although there are multiple issues which adversely affect this population, for the purpose of this paper the main focus will be on workplace discrimination based on sexual orientation and race. This research will be framed by exploring Culturally Appropriate Career Counseling and Stereotype Threat theory. These two theoretical career counseling competencies will examine the world of the WOCLGBTQQII client by offering specific interventions which empower the individual client.


Saturday March 7, 2015 1:05pm - 2:05pm
Redwood

1:05pm

The Mediating Effects of Objectified Body Consciousness On Personality and Disordered Eating Attitudes
A concerning maladaptive pattern of beliefs and behaviors among women is that of disordered eating. This often leads to serious health consequences and clinical eating disorders. Although extensive research has been conducted in order to attempt to understand the factors which contribute to disordered eating, its incidence continues to increase (Ferrier-Auerbach & Martens, 2009). Certain personality characteristics have been linked to eating habits and attitudes. For example, Conscientiousness and Neuroticism have been found to correlate with disordered eating attitudes and habits (Claes et al., 2005). Also, objectified body consciousness, a form of self-consciousness characterized by regularly monitoring the body's outward appearance (McKinley & Hyde, 1996), positively correlates with disordered eating and weight preoccupation (Tiggemann & Kuring, 2004). Previous research has found relationships between objectified body consciousness and disordered eating as well as with personality traits, but no known studies have investigated the relationship between personality and objectified boy consciousness nor all three factors combined. The purpose of the current study was to investigate whether objectified body consciousness mediated the relationship between personality and disordered eating. One-hundred female psychology students from Southern Connecticut State University completed the NEO-Personality Inventory 3, the Objectified Body Consciousness Scale, and the Eating Attitudes Test. Neuroticism facets (self-consciousness, anxiety, depression, and vulnerability) predicted oral control (anorectic behavior). Neuroticism facets (anxiety, impulsiveness) and the Conscientiousness facet (order) predicted bulimia and food preoccupation behaviors. Anxiety, depression, vulnerability and impulsiveness correlated with objectified body consciousness. Of these, objectified body consciousness mediated the relationship between anxiety and oral control; higher levels of Neuroticism (anxiety) was associated with more objectified body consciousness which predicted higher levels of oral control. The current study provides some evidence that the factors predictive of disordered eating are multidimensional and combine with each other to create complex sets of risk factors for unhealthy eating.


Saturday March 7, 2015 1:05pm - 2:05pm
Redwood