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*Note* This scheduling program was not designed by folks who do a lot with APA Style and unfortunately it defaults to listing authors in alphabetical order. We cannot fix this for this online schedule, but the author orders are posted in the order submitted in the printed program available via pdf here.

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Pre-Conference [clear filter]
Thursday, March 5
 

8:00am

Sacrificial Advocates: A Restorative Justice Experience to reflect upon our conditions, gather our resources, reaffirm our strength, and choose our responses
This workshop is developed as a restorative justice experience for women who have experienced the stress of being an advocate for social justice while holding a “marginalized” status. This workshop is a space to reflect upon our conditions, gather our resources, reaffirm our goals and strength, and choose our responses.


Thursday March 5, 2015 8:00am - 12:00pm
Oregon

8:00am

Supervision Frameworks: Addressing Diversity, Intersectionality, and Social Justice
This workshop addresses supervision and diversity, particularly the intersections of gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation, and disability. Four experienced supervisors will offer best practices, processes, case examples, and exercises for supervising diverse students and addressing their diverse clients within a framework of multiple identities. The first presenter will provide feminist/multicultural models of supervision that facilitate supervisees’ expanding knowledge and reducing resistance to self-reflection and dialogue. Topics include: power, privilege, identity development, and under- or over-identification with members of diverse groups. The models are grounded in feminist, The second presenter will explore multicultural considerations and the complexity of issues, such as “cookbook” cultural interventions, socialization into politically correct thinking, and fear of exposure of “not knowing.” These issues complicate the dialogue between supervisor, trainee, and client. A framework for transforming this dialogue toward a more reflective multicultural metapsychology will be advanced. Presenter #3 will address the changing face of supervision for LGBT supervisees and clients. New issues have surfaced as the availability of information about LGBT issues and the sophistication of current supervisees have increased. Topics will include: shifting from a focus on homophobia/heterocentrism to new realities in the lives of LGBT individuals; providing multiple ways to assess supervisees’ competencies with LGBT people and communities; strategies for helping supervisees determine the role of LGBT issues in case formulation; and addressing obstacles to effective interventions and relationships. The fourth presenter will address ways to supervise individuals with disabilities. She will delineate manifestations of both “concrete” barriers, such as physical access, absence of sign language interpreting or Braille materials, and contextual/ psychological barriers such as isolation, prejudice and discrimination. She will describe ways for supervisors to maximize the probability of success for the supervisor, the supervisee, the client, and the agency. Both commonalities across disabilities and specific issues and accommodations for categories of disabilities will be addressed


Thursday March 5, 2015 8:00am - 12:00pm
Crystal

8:00am

Teaching Cultural Competence in Mental Health Training Programs
This workshop offers participants the opportunity to acquire substantive information and skill enhancement in the construction and instruction of the courses that seek to develop cultural competence in mental health training programs. The presenter will examine the pedagogical components that are deemed necessary for training clinicians to be competent in the delivery of psychological services to members of culturally diverse groups. Such groups include but are not exclusive to, women, people of color, lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered men and women, people with disabilities, members of diverse religious groups and socioeconomic statuses, immigrants, particularly dynamics that apply to individuals who have multiple identities along these axes. The workshop will also identify challenges that instructors frequently encounter and strategies for negotiating those challenges.


Thursday March 5, 2015 8:00am - 12:00pm
Washington

8:00am

White Women Unlearning Racism
This 4-hour workshop provides in-depth preparation for the AWP IMP-sponsored session during regular conference hours. The workshop, facilitated by White Women in addition to a Woman of Color, uses a combination of psychoeducational and experiential approaches to raise critical awareness around White Women’s privilege. The first step in unlearning racism is to acknowledge that as White Women, we have all internalized racist messages to some degree. Through dialogue, our agenda as facilitators is to help each participant identify where you are in the process of unlearning and challenging racism as White Women. We will also discuss what it means to be White and explore examples of White privilege, distinguish between overt and covert racism, identify the process of racial tokenism, discuss principles of anti-racist action and advocacy, and provide strategies for overcoming racism within our communities and ourselves. As facilitators, we will encourage personal racial self-analysis and awareness with a critical consciousness through multimedia material, handouts, and opportunities for small and large group work. We are aware that White Women attending this workshop may be at different stages in unlearning racism, and recognize this material is inherently intense and oftentimes uncomfortable. Thus, we encourage self-care throughout.


Thursday March 5, 2015 8:00am - 12:00pm
Gold Rush B

8:00am

Women of Color Institute: Eradicating Myopic Thinking: The Root of Unconscious Bias - The Core of Racism
The focus of this session is unconscious bias and the racial micro-aggressions in which it often results. Within that context, workshop discussions will focus on the root cause of unconscious bias, its impact on recipients, and some very specific, effective strategies for eradicating it. This is a very interactive session.


Thursday March 5, 2015 8:00am - 12:00pm
Gold Rush A

8:00am

Beyond Violence: A Prevention Program for Women Involved in the Criminal Justice System
This training provides an introduction to a new evidence-based, manualized curriculum for women in jails, prisons, community corrections, and the larger community. This trauma-informed curriculum is aimed at reducing aggression, regulating anger and helping women to develop ways of living that are incompatible with violence. It uses the Social-Ecological Model to understand and contextualize violence. This four-level model of violence prevention considers the complex interplay between individual, relationship, community, and societal factors. It addresses the factors that put people at risk for experiencing and/or perpetuating violence, and incorporates women’s experiences as victims and perpetrators of violence. This model of violence prevention is used by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), World Health Organization (WHO), and was used in the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) research on women in prison. This is the first evidence-based curriculum on this topic and is suitable for use in community corrections, as well as institutional settings. The curriculum consists of 20 sessions (2 hours per session) and incorporates a variety of evidence-based therapeutic strategies (i.e., psycho-education, role playing, mindfulness activities, cognitive-behavioral restructuring, and grounding skills for trauma). Two versions of this curriculum will be shared during the session: Beyond Violence: A Prevention Program for Criminal-Justice Involved Women and Beyond Anger and Violence: A Program for Women which is designed for women in community-based settings. During this training session, attendees will participate in some of the interactive exercises, such as calming and grounding exercises, cognitive-behavioral techniques, and role playing activities. All activities will be voluntary and will vary in individual and small-group format. Attendees will also view portions of a film entitled What I Want My Words to Do to You that is used in the curriculum and displays both women’s stories of their experiences with violence and core components of the intervention.

Speakers
SC

Stephanie Covington

Center for Gender and Justice
GF

Gina Fedock

Michigan State University


Thursday March 5, 2015 8:00am - 5:00pm
Nevada

1:00pm

Empowering Women with Chronic Illness and Disability: Best Practices for Psychological and Mind/body Interventions
Autoimmune disorders affect more women than men, and carry multiple sequelae common in chronic illness or disability (CID). This workshop focuses on the psychologist’s role in empowering women with CID to self-manage and advocate. We cover the psychological challenges, psychological and mind/body interventions for symptoms, trauma resolution, developing a wellness plan and working with medical professionals.


Thursday March 5, 2015 1:00pm - 5:00pm
California

1:00pm

Implicit Attitudes: A Research-based model for understanding and interrupting subtle forms of bias and oppression
This workshop provides an introduction to implicit attitudes, a framework for thinking about issues around diversity that bypasses shame and blame while offering a vehicle for taking responsibility for creating real change. The research on implicit attitudes suggests one important empirically based avenue for understanding how, despite so much laudable institutional change, different forms of oppression continue to present members of target (and non-target) groups with constraints and challenges. The implicit attitudes framework allows us to label some of the more subtle forms in which oppression occur and provides clear implications for intervention. This workshop will demonstrate applications of this model to such areas as diversity training, psychotherapy/counseling, academic skills development, group therapy, work with members of targeted groups and groups of allies, and varied teaching, outreach and consultation interventions. This workshop will begin with a thorough exploration of the implicit attitudes model and how it can be used to understand subtler dynamics in issues of oppression. We will create a community of participants who will focus on developing a working understanding of the model, with attention to the dynamics of sexism, racism, homophobia/heterosexism, ableism, classism, genderism, anti-immigrant bias, and religious bias. We will be sharing real life examples of applying the implicit attitudes model in an array of settings looking at both successes and challenges. Participants will take part in interactive and experiential activities to allow for practice with labeling, explaining, and interrupting these attitudes and addressing them at personal, interpersonal, institutional, and climate levels. Participants will leave with clear action steps of how the implicit attitudes model can be used in their own personal and professional work.


Thursday March 5, 2015 1:00pm - 5:00pm
Oregon

1:00pm

The Pedagogy of Privilege and Oppression: Classroom Techniques and Strategies to Build student Critical Consciousness
Many feminist scholars strive to create safe classroom environments that deepen students’ awareness, and raise critical consciousness about the ways societies disperse social power within hierarchies across the world. In order to support a community of teaching pedagogy that promotes this awareness, the purpose of this workshop is to share specific tools and techniques that have found to be successful in classrooms when discussing issues such as identity, inequality, social power, oppression, and privilege. This interactive workshop aims to introduce attendees to four teaching tools focused on raising the critical consciousness of undergraduate and graduate students in classrooms. These activities may also be adapted for use with community groups or in workplace settings. Workshop attendees will have an opportunity to participate in each simulated activity. Each experiential learning activity will begin with an exercise that either requires participants to become aware of their power and privilege or simulates a real world experience that replicates systems of privilege and oppression. This will be followed with a facilitated discussion about how the participant’s social identity is implicated within systems of social power; this discussion will model practices that can be used in classrooms and other group settings. The workshop will conclude with a facilitated conversation about the heightened awareness that came as a result of participation in the exercises. Facilitators will provide attendees with materials on how to run the activities, and suggestions about how to use them in different classrooms.

Speakers
NB

Nicole Buchanan

Michigan State University
ZH

Zaje Harrell

Public Policy Associates
IS

Isis Settles

Michigan State University


Thursday March 5, 2015 1:00pm - 5:00pm
Crystal

1:00pm

Trauma Recovery Networks - Feminism, EMDR Therapy, and Disaster Response - Healing Our Communities
This workshop is for researchers, clinicians (not necessarily trained in Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing), and activists interested in how disaster response, based in EMDR Therapy, can increase community resilience by healing trauma and providing treatment to underserved populations. The Boston Area TRN (Trauma Recovery Network), a local chapter in the EMDR therapy community’s Humanitarian Assistance Programs, consists of licensed clinicians who provide pro-bono EMDR to people affected by community disasters. TRNs were born out of the EMDR community’s response to the Oklahoma City bombing, and have responded to world-wide events such as natural disasters (tornados, hurricanes, fires, earthquakes and tsunamis), and violent acts (9/11, the Newtown shooting, the Boston Marathon Bombing, ongoing conflicts in Israel and Palestine, the Syrian refugees in Turkey, and others). We will review basic concepts within disaster mental health, community psychology, and EMDR therapy, and issues with conducting research in disaster mental health (Norris et al, 2006; Pfefferbaum, et al, 2012; Weine et al 2002; Call et al, 2012). We will discuss the use of EMDR as an effective intervention for disasters, and options for Early EMDR Intervention (EEI) (Shapiro and Laub, 2008; Laidlaw-Chasse and Miller, 2013). We will explore several of the issues involved in building and launching a TRN (Gelbach, 2008; Colelli et al, 2013). Using specific experiences of the Boston Area TRN’s response to the Boston Marathon bombing and chronic community violence, we will examine strategies for providing services to traditionally underserved communities, and how concepts can be redefined in non-traditional ways in the service of community change. Throughout the presentation will be attention to principles of feminism – what we as feminists know about the costs of trauma in the personal/private and public spheres – illustrated by case examples that show how disaster response interventions can improve lives from a feminist perspective.


Thursday March 5, 2015 1:00pm - 5:00pm
Washington

1:00pm

1:00pm

“Calling In” vs. “Calling Out”: Intentional Relational Practices in Our Restorative and Social Justice Work
Confronting our areas of ignorance and making mistakes is inevitable and necessary for our growth in activism work. At the same time, many of us have witnessed the “call out culture” of social justice spaces, in which members of our communities are silenced, superficially told to “check their privilege,” or shunned when they have unknowingly enacted a microaggression. As feminist scholars and therapists, we are inspired by writer Ngọc Loan Trần’s practice of “Calling In” – a compassionate, connecting way of inviting people to reflect on the relational and community effects of their words and actions - as a transformational response to microaggressions that occur within activist spaces. Aligned with principles of restorative justice, the focus of calling in is addressing and healing the impact of hurtful acts within a community, rather than on punishing an “offender.” We propose that calling each other in, instead of simply calling out, can facilitate repair and reconnection following a microaggression, promote greater openness and creativity in activist communities, and contribute to building sustainable social justice movements. This experiential workshop will offer participants opportunities to explore ways to be effective allies, activists, and restorative justice workers when working in multiracial coalitions and restorative justice movements. Participants will critically analyze power dynamics and the impact of “call out culture” in social and restorative justice work and communities. Through our explorations, we will learn principles of Ngoc Loan Tran’s practice of “Calling In” and discover ways to create more relational and healing spaces within social change movements. Participants will be invited to apply principles of “Calling In” in pairs and small groups throughout the workshop.


Thursday March 5, 2015 1:00pm - 5:00pm
Gold Rush B