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*Note* This scheduling program was not designed by folks who do a lot with APA Style and unfortunately it defaults to listing authors in alphabetical order. We cannot fix this for this online schedule, but the author orders are posted in the order submitted in the printed program available via pdf here.

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Structured Discussion [clear filter]
Friday, March 6
 

1:05pm

Walking the Line: On Feminism within a Patriarchal Culture
There are intersections of identities that may appear to be a contradiction. Occasionally these intersections lead to cognitive dissonance whereby accepting one identity indicates the denial of another. This structured discussion will focus on two specific identities, identifying as a feminist and identifying with a culture that is patriarchal. Patriarchal cultures typically have values that are viewed as oppressive to women. Take for example the Hmong culture where daughters are traditionally raised under the notion that they will one day marry and no longer belong with their birth family. Upon marriage, Hmong daughters will be a part of their husband’s family instead. This belief traditionally privileges Hmong sons and men over Hmong daughter or women. Another example is when Hmong women get out of abusive marriages and experience shaming and rejection from their own community. Some Hmong women believe their culture or even their birth parents have betrayed them. Feeling rejected by other Hmong people, divorced Hmong women often feel as though they cannot go back to their cultural community. The current structured discussion will provide some cultural contexts to the examples provided above. The goal of the discussion is to compile ideas for women who feel like they have been wronged by their culture so they may have restorative justice. This discussion gives women in psychology a chance to voice stories, opinions, and ideas on how to be a feminist within a patriarchal culture.


Friday March 6, 2015 1:05pm - 2:05pm
Gold Rush A
 
Saturday, March 7
 

1:05pm

Beyond Ferguson, MO: Giving voice to Black female victims of murder and other atrocities
Michael Brown, Eric Garner, Oscar Grant, Sean Bell, Amadou Diallo, Trayvon Martin, and Jordan Davis are all Black men who were murdered unjustly either by the police or by a racially motivated white male. There names have made national headlines, and many Black communities and individuals have mobilized to call for justice in their honor, and in the honor and protection of all Black boys and men. The many protest and communal actions that have ensued are evidence of great acts of resistance and social justice mobilizing that proudly state “Black lives matter!”, however, when Black women—especially Black trans women—are slaughtered daily and by the dozens, these same acts of communal mobilizing and vigils of honor are non-existent. President Obama and many other political officials and scholars have righteously given support and condolences in the murders of the aforementioned slain men, yet, little to no consolation, acknowledgement, nor support have been given to Tarika Wilson, Aiyana Jones, Shantel Davis, Rekia Boyd, Islan Nettles, Chanelle Pickett, Nireah Johnson, Erica Keels, Dana A. Larkin, Duana Johnson, Brandy Martell, and Yazmin Sanchez, all Black females—both cis and transgender—who have been unjustly murdered and forgotten. This structured discussion is guided by a Black feminist framework (Collins, 1991) and also by W.E.B. DuBois’ double consciousness (1903). As Black feminist thought seeks to move the stories and experiences of Black women from margin to center, and Black women are simultaneously doubly conscious of the plights of Black men. Thus, our goal is not to create a hierarchy of oppression, but instead, to restore justice and equality to Black women. Moreover, the aim of this talk is to begin to think about how we as feminist psychologist can assist in restoration of justice and voice to Black women.


Saturday March 7, 2015 1:05pm - 2:05pm
Gold Rush A

2:25pm

Inclusive, Incomplete, or In-between: Exploring the feminist perspective in graduate diversity courses
APA accredited graduate programs for clinical, counseling and school psychology have a required diversity training component with objectives that include students attaining: “substantial understanding and competence.” Yet these programs seek to achieve these objectives in a variety of ways. A recent meta-analysis concluded that diversity trainings are positively related to cognitive development. However, Bowman found that these cognitive benefits associated with diversity coursework are limited to white and low-income students. How inclusive is this curriculum as it relates to the cultural intersections within the “female graduate student?” We propose to facilitate a structured discussion from a feminist perspective that explores the relationship of the intersections of identity within female graduate students and its corollary influence on the improvement of diversity training effectiveness. Our overarching goal will be to approach this discussion with the aim of encouraging participants to consider their personal training experiences and the feminist perspective in order to inform suggestions. First, participants will have the opportunity to explore their own identity intersections. Then, attendees will be asked to consider and share their personal experiences of their academic diversity training. This will include an exploration of the aspects of diversity training that intersect with, contradict or avoid the female perspective. Simultaneously, we will consider how the female experience and feminist values could be incorporated and emphasized to achieve the heightened awareness and proficiency the APA envisions. Finally, we will scrutinize how diversity programs could be improved. Potential questions include: Where is diversity training effective, and for whom? How can diversity training go beyond raising awareness to increasing actual competency in practice? What does research indicate is most effective for increasing competence? What elements of female cultural considerations should be incorporated into diversity training? How can greater inclusion of the female perspective increase course efficacy?


Saturday March 7, 2015 2:25pm - 3:25pm
Gold Rush A

2:25pm

Structured Discussion: The different needs of women and girls in the justice system: How can we address gender differences in the needs for protection within the institution for female inmates.
The incarceration of women and girls has shifted in our society. According to the CDCR (2014), Female incarceration rates have increased dramatically in the last 10 years. Working in the county jail and juvenile hall systems within California for the past few months has exposed me to the different needs that men and women demonstrate while incarcerated. For many women, being locked up provides safety and protection from the sexual and physical violence they have experienced throughout their lives (Bradley & Davino, 2002). The safety that is felt by some women while incarcerated is very different than the expressed experience for men regarding safety. This is not to minimize the trauma and violence experienced by men in these settings, however through my early experience in incarceration, I have noticed different needs and ways of being protected and provided safety for women and girls compared to men and boys. The culture of a female correctional unit feels very different than that of a male correctional unit, which represents nothing novel or groundbreaking. Carol Gilligan’s (1982) characterization of male and female differences is very evident in the environment of incarceration. The male standard of treatment found within the walls of juvenile halls, jails and prisons, serve to disregard the gender-specific needs for women if the aim is for rehabilitation. Even the ways in which genders are tried in court is conflicted: “A distinction was drawn between male’s emphasis on autonomy and an ethics of right and justice in resolving a case and women’s subscribing to an ethics of care with an emphasis on the social impact of a decision.” (Von Wormer, 2010). Furthermore, restorative justice from the perspective of Barton (2001) recognizes multiple ways of enacting justice for the offender and the victim, however the victimization of women in the male-dominant correctional environments hinders that corrective process.


Saturday March 7, 2015 2:25pm - 3:25pm
Gold Rush A

3:45pm

Navigating the Personal in the Political Realm: Women of Color in Higher Education Positions
Given the growing number of women of color in clinical, teaching, administration and leadership positions in higher education, it is imperative to explore how women of color may be perceived and treated in these roles. We plan to facilitate a discussion that addresses (a) the navigation of maintaining and asserting one’s multifaceted identity in the workplace in the midst of assumed identities and stereotypes based on physical appearance, (b) the intersection between cultural identities and (c) workplace dynamics and positions of power. This structured discussion targets the growing number of women of color in institutions of higher education. The increase in women of color in these positions has presented university environments with novel multicultural challenges and opportunities. The conversation will provide a forum for participants to discuss multicultural and social justice issues experienced across different settings and contexts in higher education as well as opportunity to learn and share strategies to address challenging and distressing experiences. The facilitators will have pre-designed questions and 1-2 vignettes to stimulate a critical dialogue. We will provide insights from our experiences as women of color with other intersecting identities, and encourage participants to self-reflect and share their experiences, as well. We hope that this structured discussion will be conducive to greater understanding, awareness and personal reflection.


Saturday March 7, 2015 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Gold Rush A