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*Note* This scheduling program was not designed by folks who do a lot with APA Style and unfortunately it defaults to listing authors in alphabetical order. We cannot fix this for this online schedule, but the author orders are posted in the order submitted in the printed program available via pdf here.

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Symposium [clear filter]
Friday, March 6
 

1:05pm

A New Look at Women's Objectification: Christianity, Social Media, and Sisterhood
Objectification theory posits the objectification of women by their culture leads to a mental separation of the woman from her body, creating self-valuation tied closely to societal ideals (Fredrickson & Roberts, 1997; Stratemeyer, 2012). A variety of mental health issues have arisen from women's experience of objectification (Fredrickson & Roberts, 1997). Objectification also negatively impacts women's interpersonal relationships (Daniels & Zurbriggen, 2014) and leads to increased violence against women (Stratemeyer, 2014). This symposium presents three perspectives on the application of restorative justice to women’s objectification. A restorative justice approach is more humanistic in nature focusing on victim-centered reparations and often includes community involvement (van Wormer, 2009). Several considerations will be reviewed regarding the way objectification of women has been perpetuated through US culture. These considerations may provide a pathway to social justice by deconstructing women's objectification experiences and initiating opportunities for community healing. The current considerations include objectification of women in Christian purity culture, social media as perpetuating objectification and sister relationships as a potential mitigating factor for adolescent girls’ experience of objectification. We intend to focus on the way women are impacted by objectification as it intersects with religiosity, social media, and sibling relationships separately. Our presentation will focus on literature surrounding these topics and the ways current research can be applied to working with women dealing with intrapersonal and interpersonal consequences of objectification. The purpose of this symposium is to initiate a conversation regarding contemporary factors related to objectification of women with a focus on restorative justice. References Daniels, E.A., & Zurbriggen, E.L. (2014). The price of sexy: Viewers' perceptions of a sexualized versus nonsexualized Facebook profile photograph. Psychology of Popular Media Culture, advanced online publication. doi: 10.1037/ppmm0000048 Fredrickson, B.L., & Roberts, T.A. (1997). Objectification theory: Toward understanding women’s lived experiences and mental health risks. Psychology of Women Quarterly, 21, 173-206. doi: 10.1111/j.1471-6402.1997.tb00108.x Stratemeyer, M. (2014). "Here's looking at you": Psychological perspectives on sexual objectification. Issues, 107, 24-26. van Wormer, K. (2009). Restorative justice as social justice for victims of gendered violence: A standpoint feminist perspective. Social Work, 54(2), 107-116.


Friday March 6, 2015 1:05pm - 2:05pm
Oregon

2:25pm

Giving Voice to The Victim: Consent and Rape Culture in Popular Media
As evidenced by recent attention from the press, questions around institutional policy, and public outcry, politics regarding sexual violence have become particularly pertinent within Western culture. These articulations play out across an array of discourses, including media landscapes. Drawing from popular culture and contemporary literature, television, and film, the papers in this symposium will utilize feminist frameworks to delineate how our society understands and reacts to sexual violence. This symposium serves to ask: Where and how do we learn about sexual violence? Why do media outlets so often romanticize and glorify abusive relationships? What are the implications of consuming these problematic media images? Both presenters will extrapolate from their continued research on rape culture to analyze the real-world impact of these media depictions. The specific and insidious abusive links within several popular television series and novels, among them Scandal, Game of Thrones, Twilight, and 50 Shades of Grey, are analyzed. The presenters assert that the marketing and development of these media series suggest that abuse is acceptable and favorable, and that rape serves to function primarily as a plot device. Norms of masculinity, femininity, and heterosexuality all play a role in constructing images of victims and abusers, “good girls” and “bad girls”, and notions of true love. Furthermore, these portrayals contribute to the existence and proliferation of rape culture. The presenters find that these media examples actively harm individual consumers and inspire the creation of similarly problematic media-- an effect which is exacerbated when that content is disseminated across the globe. Additionally, the presenters bring an activist dimension to their work by including victims’ words and experiences, and by confronting the culture of silence that surrounds sexualized harm. This symposium strives to cultivate new directions for feminist social justice efforts, particularly in approaches to rape, resistance, prevention, violence, and victimhood.


Friday March 6, 2015 2:25pm - 3:25pm
Nevada
 
Sunday, March 8
 

8:30am

Serve You Right : Addressing disparities for adolescent girls who are members of underserved ethnicities.
Using an ecological framework, multisystem factors contributing to the disparities between majority and underserved ethnic populations can be explored along with ways to heal and rebuild communities through research, collaboration and advocacy. Factors such as cultural beliefs, womens issues, racism, power imbalances, heterosexism, and sexism are among risk factors that will be discussed. This presentation will explore intervention and prevention programs at the individual, community, and societal levels in order to fully address this sexual health disparity. At the individual level, the burden of risky sexual behavior, practices, and outcomes fall heavily on ethnic minority females. Race/ethnicity and gender specific rates show Black and Hispanic females have higher rates of sexual intercourse, putting them at risk of STIs and unplanned pregnancies in high school years. At the microsystem level, family and peers have a strong influence on sexual behaviors. Family communication can have an impact the age of sexual debut, contraception use, and attitudes toward sexuality. Peer relationships, both positive and negative, have a strong influence on adolescent sexual behaviors such as condom use. For instance, when members of adolescent peer groups have positive attitudes toward condoms, it predicts personal usage. Programs using these factors will be discussed. Research on risk and protective factors provide some gender-based directions for constructing community based programs and interventions in school settings. Research has found that effective programs for this population offer access to accurate information about contraceptive use and STIs/HIV using culturally sensitive methods that address factors such as gender scripts of control and dominance. In order to fully address the sexual health disparity affecting ethnic minority adolescents, it is also necessary to examine factors at the macrosystem (societal) level. This paper will explore strategies in advocacy at all levels which help to achieve social change benefiting this population.


Sunday March 8, 2015 8:30am - 9:45pm
California