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*Note* This scheduling program was not designed by folks who do a lot with APA Style and unfortunately it defaults to listing authors in alphabetical order. We cannot fix this for this online schedule, but the author orders are posted in the order submitted in the printed program available via pdf here.

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Symposium [clear filter]
Saturday, March 7
 

1:05pm

Current Trends in Research on Bisexuality
While bisexuality has been a topic of much discussion in the arena of popular culture, this orientation is seen as a controversial and often misunderstood concept (Klesse, 2011). Outside of popular culture, the topic of bisexuality is beginning to gain grounds in the research arena as well (Klein, 2014; Bostwick, 2013). Misunderstandings about bisexuality tend to revolve around relation of bisexuality to the heterosexual and lesbian/gay communities, bisexual monogamy, and the idea that bisexuality reinforces the gender binary. These misunderstandings have the potential to negatively affect not only the ways in which bisexual individuals experience support from community, family, and friends, but also the ways in which researchers and clinicians understand the plight of this minority community situated within an already marginalized community. With an understanding of these misconceptions, this panel will discuss some current trends related to research on bisexuality. Some of the current trends relate to issue surrounding bisexuality and monogamy, bisexuality, and community, and clinical concerns with bisexual clients. These trends will be addressed by members of the panel. In addressing these current research trends, this panel will attempt to provide information on the most current research available on bisexual individuals and the bisexual community. The implication of a greater understanding of bisexual issues in relation to clinical, research, educational, and advocacy implication will be discussed.

Speakers
SH

Sharon Horne

University of Massachusetts Boston
TI

Tania Israel

University of California Santa Barbara
TR

Tangela Roberts

University of Massachusetts Boston


Saturday March 7, 2015 1:05pm - 2:05pm
Washington

2:25pm

Encouraging STEM to Bloom: Small Interventions for Girls and Young Women
Males and females exhibit similar math and science achievement levels in K-12. Therefore, other variables are believed to play a considerable role in the continued underrepresentation of females and minorities in certain STEM career trajectories. This symposium will provide an overview and present data from three different types of studies that seek to impact attitudes about math, science, and gender stereotypes and enhance behavioral performance on STEM-related tasks. National and international data on female achievement in math and science will be reviewed. Math and science anxiety will be defined and operationalized and examples of assessment measures used in this area will be demonstrated. Gender stereotyping in STEM and the use of measures such as the Gender-Science Implicit Attitudes Test (IAT) are described. Methods for encouraging females to develop and maintain a strong math and science self-concept are explored. Data are presented from a study on pre-service teachers, suggesting that anxious attitudes about math and science and stereotypes about gender and science may be implicitly conveyed to K-12 students, impact female students more than male students, and could potentially be prevented. Outcome data are also presented on a brief mindful math intervention for female college students designed to increase math performance and decrease negative cognitions. Lastly, brief “reverse” stereotype threat interventions aimed at female, ethnic minority and low SES college students are described and discussed, with the goal of creating new and potentially quick methods for decreasing math and science anxiety and enhancing performance levels in these populations.


Saturday March 7, 2015 2:25pm - 3:25pm
Washington