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*Note* This scheduling program was not designed by folks who do a lot with APA Style and unfortunately it defaults to listing authors in alphabetical order. We cannot fix this for this online schedule, but the author orders are posted in the order submitted in the printed program available via pdf here.

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Workshop [clear filter]
Friday, March 6
 

1:05pm

Responding to Disability Microaggressions: A Programmatic Approach
This workshop will expose attendees to the process of developing a disability ally program at a post-secondary university and will include topics addressed, collaboration, initial data and lessons learned. We will also discuss the process of purposefully developing an “ally” program and not an “advocacy” program, as well as thoughts about the inclusion of culturally immersive experiences within programming and the stand we have decided to take on disability simulation. Although touted for being a disability-friendly institution, disability was consistently ignored or treated differently in conversations regarding the spectrum of inclusivity and cultural awareness on our campus. When others on campus were engaging in conversations around disability, it was piecemeal, fragmented and generally unsupported. We found this in the literature as even in Sue, et al.,’s descriptions of microaggressions, ability is not on the table (an oversight which they are currently amending). As information that ability microaggressions were increasing towards our students despite our efforts, we felt as though developing a disability ally program and developing an official statement on disability simulation was absolutely imperative in improving our students’ mental health by changing the environment they are a part of. In addition, we engaged in many discussions across the country where if disability programs existed, they were advocacy programs from outside of the community that appeared to fizzle when student interest waned. We developed this program based on current best practices in culturally competent programming, fusing cultural awareness, intersectionality, and social-emotional connection and would like to share the disability ally program we have piloted to assist other feminist practitioners in helping to restore justice in environments that have been harmful to us and our students. We would like to encourage others to include ability in every conversation about diversity, equity, and inclusion in order to help repair this longstanding oversight. Sue, D.W., Capodilupo, C.M., Torino, G.C., Bucceri, J.M., Holder, A.M.B., Nadal, K.L., & Esquilin, M. (2007). Racial microaggressions in everyday life: Implications for Clinical Practice. American Psychologist, 62(4), 271-286. doi:10.1037/0003-066X.62.4.271


Friday March 6, 2015 1:05pm - 2:05pm
Washington

2:25pm

From Ferguson to Gaza: Restorative Justice, Feminism and Beyond
Ferguson and Gaza raise complex political issues that impact personal and communal experiences. These events are iconic reflections of the ways structural violence dehumanizes people with less social and political power. When those in power control the discourse, reality is distorted. Some people use the dominant narrative to justify racist and inhumane treatment. Others experience dissonance as they try to integrate their sense of justice with conflicting loyalties to racial, ethnic or national identity. As feminist teachers and clinicians we are committed to interventions that challenge dominant narratives and encourage alternative dialogue. Circles -a gift from Native Nations widely used throughout the world- are natural tools for this endeavor. The use of Circles is auspicious at a time when feminism has found a place in Academia yet strayed from grassroots forms of consciousness raising. Circles, used in restorative justice practice, reflect feminism¹s grassroots and are powerful in extending feminist ideals to the exploration of challenging societal events. The use of Circles in feminist practice engages us in a healing process addressing dissonance and offering a space to consider possibilities for transformation of oppressive structures promoting exploitation. In this workshop participants will have the opportunity to join a Circle experience that highlights its use as a tool for feminist exploration and possible restoration. The Circle will focus on recent events in Ferguson and Gaza. It will provide a context for reflection and action through the use of four questions: How are you affected? How does your community respond or not to these events? What is your understanding of why these events happened? Considering the systemic forces causing these conditions, how can you contribute to change and/or restoration? Participants will be encouraged to bring Circles into their local communities to continue dialogue and to address the oppressive forces impinging on our lives.


Friday March 6, 2015 2:25pm - 3:25pm
Monterey/Carmel

2:25pm

Tales from the Academic Plantation: Women of color challenge oppression in the academy
This workshop examines the significance of racism, heterosexism, and sexism in American colleges and universities and its effects on women of color faculty. By examining the stories of women of color who serve as faculty and administrators in academia, presenters and participants will analyze the effects of institutionalized American racism, heterosexism, and sexism. The presenters provide a guide to avoiding the perils and pitfalls of academia, strategies for affirming and enhancing diversity, and methods for using membership in the academy and its privileges for challenging social inequity. Presenters, who are psychologists and women of color, bring their many years of experience and learning to questions of great significance to racism, sexism, and heterosexism in academia. The formal presentation outlines frequently encountered obstacles, critical issues in the struggle and offers psychological analyses and commentary on its various aspects. Presenters will focus on the interaction of racism, sexism, and heterosexism and their effects on the careers and lives of women of color professors, their students, and associates. Bringing the personal experiences of successful, “resilient” professionals to bear on these issues, they analyze and synthesize various perspectives to offer a comprehensive look at the small numbers of women of color who find their way to the front of the university classroom, and their effects on students, the nation and themselves. Keywords: social oppression, academic discrimination, women of color


Friday March 6, 2015 2:25pm - 3:25pm
Washington

3:45pm

Peacekeeping circles: A unique method in counseling training and supervision
The purpose of this workshop is to provide an overview of the use of peacekeeping circles as a unique supervision and training approach for therapists-in-training. The workshop will describe the peacekeeping circle process, its history, and its roots in the Restorative Justice model. Then, we will overview the model adopted by Northwestern University’s Mental Health Human Rights Clinic (MHHRC) as an example of peacekeeping circles in supervision and training. The MHHRC primarily serves clients who are immigrants, political refugees, and asylum seekers and who have survived traumatic histories by providing psychological evaluations and culturally sensitive counseling. Peacekeeping circles are utilized in supervision and training as a mechanism to build trainees’ awareness, skills, and confidence in order to increase comfort and competence in providing services to the clients. In this workshop, we will describe the structure and process used in the weekly healing circles as a mechanism by which trainees are able to explore their clinical work and experiences with clients. We will also overview current adaptations in different settings and the benefits and limitations of using peacekeeping circles as a clinical supervision and training model. Its target audience includes clinical supervisors, clinical trainees, educators, and individuals interested in the application of restorative justice based practices in counseling. The content will be presented via an interactive workshop with didactic and experiential components.


Friday March 6, 2015 3:45pm - 4:45pm
Oregon

3:45pm

That’s déclassé!: Recognizing class bias in cross-class interactions
Helping professionals may (unknowingly) hold certain stereotyped views towards specific social class groups. These types of beliefs can have a significant impact on one’s work with an individual in a helping relationship. This workshop is designed to help working professionals, such as psychologists, social workers, and other helping professionals become aware of the importance of social class during cross-class encounters. Diversity training frequently focuses on race, ethnicity, gender, and sexual orientation; diversity training typically fails to acknowledge the importance of social class, and the intersection of class, race, and gender. Class is at best acknowledged as impacting the individuals’ access to resources; the culture of class is not acknowledged or examined. Social class can be signaled in interpersonal interactions, through language, dress/appearance, and values (Fiske & Markus, 2012). Differences in social class can impact how one treats an individual during cross-class encounters. This workshop examines the culture of class and how this culture influences one’s understanding of the world and interactions with others. This workshop will consist of interactive activities, discussion, and role plays. Participants will generate stereotypes of 4 class groups, and discuss the origins and consequences of such stereotypes. A short presentation on the myth of meritocracy will be followed by a discussion of how this ideology impacts interactions across class boundaries. A series of role play will be used to demonstrate the role of social class and class-based micro-aggressions that might occur in helping relationships. The workshop is designed to help mental health professionals to have insight into their own beliefs about members of specific class groups, and will be better able to navigate cross-class encounters.


Friday March 6, 2015 3:45pm - 4:45pm
Nevada
 
Saturday, March 7
 

10:45am

If These Streets Could Talk: Narrative Intervention with African American Mothers in Psychologically Traumatic Communities
Deane Metzger (1992) writes "when it is our own life story that we are telling, we become aware that we are not victims of random and chaotic circumstances, that we, too, despite our grief are living meaningfully in a meaningful universe" (p. 55). This workshop will work to facilitate conversations and teachings about feminist narrative therapy and the possibilities it offers for trauma work. We will explore the importance of storytelling and personal narrative in the lives of African American mothers living in toxic traumatic neighborhoods and interventions used to unearth these narratives. We will discuss the personal and collective narratives produced by mothers who experience chronic violence and loss. This presentation is not only intended to explore the various ways in which narrative plays an important role in the lives and treatment of black mothers who are suffering from PTSD, depression, and grief, but also to spark discussion about how stories work in relationship with restorative justice to provide the optimal means of expression and healing. Narrative conversations about violence and loss are less about the passive suffering of trauma and more about growing invigorating identity stories amid the ongoing transitions that trauma occasions. The role of the narrative therapists is as a collaborator or co-author with the client. The narrative frame involves opening space for the authoring of alternative stories, the possibility of which have been previously silenced by the dominant oppressive narrative which maintains the problem. The collaborative approach of the narrative practitioner can be useful for accessing the mother's spiritual strengths by respectful inquiry into her worldview and its nuances of meaning. Attending this workshop will foster a sense of cultural sensitivity and provide a new way to think about black mothers and trauma, professionally and personally with practical applications and skills to be immediately incorporated. Metzger, D. (1992). Writing for your life: A guide and companion to the inner worlds. Harper Collins Publishers: New York

Speakers

Saturday March 7, 2015 10:45am - 12:00pm
California

10:45am

Invited Workshop: The Emerging Field of Restorative Justice

Restorative Justice is quickly emerging as a desired set of principles and practices to mediate conflict, strengthen community, and repair harm in multiple contexts. It is currently practiced in schools, community groups, and along the entire continuum of the justice process, whether as an alternative to incarceration, education program in prisons or for re-entry. It is used by social workers, students, justice advocates, professors, school teachers, psychologists, community activists, and others in the U.S. and around the globe, most notably in South Africa and New Zealand. This session is a continuation of the morning keynote panel. In the first half of the session, Sonya Shah will offer a deeper overview of restorative justice — its history, current applications and evidence-based successes and continue to explore the most critical questions emerging in the field of restorative justice. In the second part of this session, Gary Malachi Scott will engage the group in a circle process — utilizing the heart of a restorative justice practices.


Speakers
GM

Gary “Malachi” Scott

Gary “Malachi” Scott … is a 32 year old African American male who works as a Peer Community Liaison and a Restorative Justice Coordinator. During his childhood he resented his poor single parent mother for neglect and allowing one of her boyfriends to physically abuse not only... Read More →
SS

Sonya Shah

Sonya Shah is the Justice Program Director at Insight Prison Project and responsible for the oversight of the Victim Offender Education Group (VOEG) program statewide and nationally. She serves on the leadership team for Californians for Safety and Justice. Sonya has served on the... Read More →


Saturday March 7, 2015 10:45am - 12:00pm
Oregon

1:05pm

A Conversation about Empowering Clients Living with Physical Disabilities & Chronic Illnesses: Learning Lessons from a Feminist Clinical Practice, Personal Experiences, & Kafer's Relational/Social Model of Disability.

"A crippled politics of access and engagement …. yearning for an “elsewhen” - in which disability is understood ….. as political, as valuable as integral. (Kafer presents) … a hybrid political/relational model …..mak(ing) room for people to acknowledge – even mourn – a change in form or function while also acknowledging that those changes can not be understood apart from the context in which they occur. …. allow(ing) for important questions about healthcare and social justice (Kafer, 2013, pp. 3-6)." In this workshop we will talk about relational, political, existential, & practical issues clients face living with physical disabilities & chronic illnesses. We will explore how the above quote from Kafer challenges those with and without disabilities to engage this issue. Presenter will encourage participants to draw on their wisdom in this discussion. Reference: Kafer, A. (2013). Feminist, queer, crip. Indiana University Press.



Saturday March 7, 2015 1:05pm - 2:05pm
Oregon

1:05pm

Story-Telling and Meaning Making: An Integrative Approach Toward Social Justice Agendas
Throughout life, individuals experience a wide array of adverse and meaningful events that play an integral role in shaping one’s identity and sense of self. One of the major characteristics of well-formed life stories is a sense of meaning or integration of one’s experiences and of oneself (McLean & Pratt, 2006). In particular, storytelling is one form of meaning making that individuals integrate to gain a sense of deeper understanding of their own identity development (Scott, 2011). Given the innate power of storytelling, it is the goal of this workshop to create a dialogue and explore how graduate students and professionals integrate past and present experiences to inform their current and future work and how these experiences have shaped their overall identity as social justice advocates. Presenters will guide participants to construct a timeline of these important experiences and moments of impact that have occurred in their life and will be given an opportunity to share their timeline with other program participants. In this workshop, participants will: 1. Explore past and present experiences and the ways in which these events have shaped their overall identity and inform their social justice agenda with marginalized and oppressed communities; 2. Utilize culturally competent techniques and gain a multicultural perspective on related issues that are raised and shared among participants; 3. Use a supportive interpersonal alliance to provide a space that will empower graduate students and professionals through the discussions of multifaceted issues that may arise during the workshop. Furthermore, it is the goal of this workshop to encourage participants to integrate the skills learned in this workshop to empower diverse, oppressed and marginalized communities as storytelling and meaning making have been found to be powerful agency granting tools for those who have been hidden from history or left on its margins (Scott, 2011).


Saturday March 7, 2015 1:05pm - 2:05pm
Monterey/Carmel

3:45pm

One body, many gazes: Disordered Eating, Relational-Cultural Therapy and Post-Structural Feminist Theory
Historically, eating disorders and disordered eating have been framed as a problem that happens to young, white, heterosexual, middle- and upper-class women (Schlundt, 1990). Despite a growing recognition that eating problems affect women across sociocultural locations (Harris & Kuba, 1997; Kuba & Harris, 2012; Lester, 2007; Thompson, 1994), there remains a dearth of research or treatment models which attend to multicultural issues in the treatment of eating disorders and disordered eating. This workshop proposes the incorporation of a post-structural feminist lens into the practice of relational-cultural therapy (RCT), specifically for the treatment of women with disordered eating. RCT is a feminist and social justice oriented therapeutic approach, which pays particular attention to relational connections and disconnections, the central role of social context, and the importance of therapist responsiveness and authenticity. Feminist post-structural theory may enhance the practice of RCT as it supports a more complex and layered understanding of the self and of the individual’s experiences, allowing for greater depth and authenticity in psychodynamic exploration. Special attention is given to the concepts of “the multiple and contradictorily constituted self” and “multiple gazes” (Eckermann, 2009, p. 13). The second portion of the workshop will present a clinical case study of a client with disordered eating, highlighting the importance of attending to sociocultural issues as an integral part of treatment. In the final portion of the workshop, participants will apply the model to the clinical case study and their own case material, in order to explore how the proposed model may enhance therapeutic process. Works Cited Eckermann, L. (2009). Theorising self-starvation: Beyond risk, governmentality and the normalising gaze. In H. Malson & M. Burns (Eds.), Critical Feminist Approaches to Eating Dis/Orders. Routledge. Harris, D. J., & Kuba, S. A. (1997). Ethnocultural identity and eating disorders in women of color. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 28(4), 341–347. Kuba, S. A., & Harris, D. J. (2012). Understanding the Role of Gender and Ethnic Oppression when Treating Mexican American Women for Eating Disorders. Women & Therapy, 35, 19–30. Lester, R. J. (2007). Critical Therapeutics: Cultural Politics and Clinical Reality in Two Eating Disorder Treatment Centers. Medical Anthropology Quarterly, 21(4), 369–387. Schlundt, D. (1990). Eating Disorders: Assessment and Treatment. Boston: Allyn and Bacon. Thompson, B. W. (1994). A Hunger so Wide and so Deep: American Women Speak Out on Eating Problems. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

Speakers
JV

Jennifer Vera

The Women's Therapy Center


Saturday March 7, 2015 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Monterey/Carmel
 
Sunday, March 8
 

8:30am

Feminism and The Trans* Revolution: Because Patriarchy is bad for every body
Feminism and the trans* revolution share a common foundation in the struggles against patriarchy, and for the full humanity of all people. A system of power and privilege that values white, young, cisgender, able-bodied men over all others limits people’s access to a rich and full life, and oversimplifies complex experiences and expressions of identity. Trans* activists and feminists share a desire to inhabit a body that is transgressive and challenges systems of beauty, sexuality, and body autonomy. Feminists and trans* activists share an adversarial relationship with the medical community that continues to be centered on the needs of cisgender white men. We also share an extensive history of having ordinary needs dismissed, pathologized and criminalized, from hysteria to limiting reproductive rights to forcing a narrative of gender transition. We share being part of a patriarchy that defines access to housing, healthcare, etc. according to bodies that count. Bodies that do not count are institutionalized and criminalized. In this interactive workshop, we want to build on the strengths of these movements, and to acknowledge that being a trans* activist and being a feminist are not only compatible, but they empower one another. Valuing interdependence, acknowledging systems of oppression, and empowering people relationally only serve to strengthen the realization of feminist vision, challenging patriarchy and helping all oppressed and marginalized people (including women of all gender identities, expressions, races, abilities, and gender nonconforming people) to thrive. We will look at the richness and complexities of intersecting identities, highlighting how systems of oppression make false dichotomies. Over the last several decades in the feminist movement, we have seen incredible and positive change: women working against being pathologized, having consistent access to healthcare, and having access to the workforce. These same changes have been gaining momentum in the trans* rights movement, especially over the past 15 years. Our movements cannot exist without one another. The feminist and trans* movements are strengthened when connections are made between racial, gender and economic justice. Both movements have learned and are learning about building true solidarity with people of color, people living in poverty, people living with disabilities, and people of all sexual and gender identities and expressions. Race and class divides among women continue to run deep. This is true for trans* and cisgender women of color who continue to live at an intense level of poverty and endangerment compared to white wealthy women. Trans* women of color especially experience extreme rates of unemployment and job discrimination, incarceration, and HIV infection. The foundations of the feminist movement compel us to value the lives of trans* women. There are many places where our movements are pitted against one another, and this is not new in the struggle for social justice. We are constantly invited to feed on each other rather than looking toward a common goal. This is how oppression works, in a systematic way. Patriarchy sustains the ways that our people and our movements are pitted against one another. We are working toward a common goal of ending oppression, and we have and continue to encounter misogyny in all social movements. Scarcity and fear, both in feeling and reality, can compel us to see others working toward similar goals as the enemy. By emphasizing the strengths of the feminist and trans* movements, we will come to a place where we remember and recognize that we are not at odds. In fact, we need one another to create a world where people of all genders have access to what they need to build not just healthy, but vibrant, thriving lives.


Sunday March 8, 2015 8:30am - 9:45am
Oregon

8:30am

Integrating Yoga into Complex Trauma Treatment
In this workshop we will define yoga and discuss how clinicians can use principles of yoga and mindfulness practices in the treatment of complex trauma. We will discuss the connection between yoga, somatic psychotherapy and theories of nervous system dysregulation as they apply to cases of complex, developmental trauma. We will thoroughly explore the risks and rewards of using these tools with traumatized populations and examine the implications of cultural competence when teaching abroad or with special populations. This workshop will provide practical tips on how clinicians can proceed in integrating yoga and mindfulness practices into both individual and group therapeutic treatment models. We begin with discussion and lecture, followed by an experiential yoga practice, debrief and discussion (participants should wear comfortable clothing for movement during the latter part of this session).


Sunday March 8, 2015 8:30am - 9:45am
Nevada

8:30am

Moving beyond text: Using visual methods to explore, contest, and transform
Over the past two decades, visual methods have grown increasingly popular in narrative, critical, feminist, and participatory research (Prosser, 2011). Mapping and photovoice, in particular, have been lauded by users as accessible and creative tools capable of transcending many of the limitations of conventional text-based methods (Futch & Fine, 2014; Wang & Burris, 1997). At the very least, mapping and photovoice provide enticing alternatives to positivist methods, particularly when working with populations who may experience language and literacy barriers. At their best, they expand the ways we express, represent, and construct our multiple selves; they shift power and agency into the participant’s hands; they provoke critical dialogue between visually documented lived experiences and sociopolitical forces; and they illuminate tensions, contradictions, and struggle as they highlight diversity within, and across, shared experiences (e.g., Futch & Fine, 2014; Katsiaficas et al., 2011; Wang & Burris, 1997). This workshop offers a practical introduction to mapping and photovoice. Drawing from our own experiences using these methods, we will guide workshop participants through a brief overview of the epistemological underpinnings of each method; an explanation of how they are used both to generate research data and enrich qualitative analyses; hands-on exercises with both techniques aimed at exemplifying the strengths and limitations of each method; suggestions for how to analyze visual data; and a discussion of the many applications and implications for broadening our epistemological lenses. It is hoped that by the end of this session, participants will see the world differently.


Sunday March 8, 2015 8:30am - 9:45am
Gold Rush B

8:30am

The Body Positive: Linking cultural transformation to psychotherapy
In this workshop we explore what feminist psychotherapists can learn from The Body Positive’s model for cultural transformation. Elizabeth Scott, psychotherapist and Co-director of The Body Positive will share powerful resources developed through 25 years of listening to middle school, high school and college-aged women as we worked together to resist body hatred, recover from eating disorders, and build Body Positive communities. The Body Positive is a non-profit organization that transforms cultural ideas about body image, weight, and identity through peer leadership in collaboration with secondary schools, community organizations, and colleges. Together we reverse our passive internalization of aggression directed at our bodies, and embrace beliefs and actions that promote confidence and excellent self-care. We begin to transform the violence directed at our bodies by speaking truth to power, and this starts by learning to confront the critical voices inside ourselves. We challenge thin privilege and its intersections with race, gender and class and declare our own beauty and worthiness. With fierce self-love we are equipped to stand up to the critical voices inside and outside of our bodies and transform them into powerful allies. We use creative arts to expand our imaginations related to beauty, beginning with the beauty in one's own ancestral inheritance. Because our path is based on individuals learning to trust their own bodily wisdom, it can be used by people from diverse cultures, body sizes, and gender identities. Results from research on The Body Positive’s leadership model conducted at Stanford University will be released in spring of 2015. In this workshop psychotherapists will learn about The Body Positive’s five powerful competencies that support the development of a peaceful and satisfying relationship to the body.


Sunday March 8, 2015 8:30am - 9:45am
Monterey/Carmel

10:05am

A Curriculum of Healing: Therapy and Education in the Cracks of Capitalism
Neoliberalism promotes social injustice through hyper-capitalism and relentless advertising (among other things), and social injustice is a form of trauma. Experiencing this trauma (e.g. poverty, discrimination, oppression, etc.) offends our dignity and taxes our spirit to the extent that we are forced into docility as a means for survival. While, indeed, the demise of capitalism seems a distant, if not impossible, dream, we take seriously John Holloway’s (2010) notion of working within the cracks of capitalism as a means for undermining this oppressive force. Because neoliberalism is so traumatizing (and, in fact, thrives on the wounded), we view healing as an essential mode of resistance. Our presentation provides an overview of a curriculum designed for a thirteen-week therapy group to be implemented in a college counseling center during a sixteen-week semester. A major premise of our work is that college students are increasingly relying on counseling services as more and more of the population feels the detrimental effects of neoliberalism.

Speakers

Sunday March 8, 2015 10:05am - 11:20am
Oregon

10:05am

Positively Sexy: A Workshop to Encourage Sexual Practices, Preferences, and Decision-Making from a Sex-Positive Approach
A sex-positive approach is one that acknowledges and celebrates the immense cultural diversity in sexual practices while simultaneously recognizing and respecting individual variations in sexual preferences and meanings (Williams, Prior, & Wegner, 2013). This 60-minute workshop will encourage attendees to consider what it means to be sex-positive and how to embody this philosophy in their daily lives. In a safe space, attendees will be encouraged to consider their own sexual practices and explore whether these behaviors are congruent with their ideals. Social, cultural, and media messages about what “good” sex is will be discussed. Workshop attendees will explore how their intersectional identities influence their constructions of “good” sex, as well as their role in their own sexual practice. The androcentric, genital-oriented sexual script will be challenged, as will the notion that certain sexual behaviors belong to particular orientations. Workshop attendees will be encouraged to consider the wide range of activities involved in sexual expression, and explore which of these sexual and relational behaviors are congruent with their identities. Agency and authenticity in one’s own sexual decision making will be emphasized. Barriers to “good” sex, including consent, physical and emotional safety concerns, and communication will be discussed. Workshop attendees will foster a new sense of what “good” sex is for them, and will consider how to attain their ideal level and style of sexual expression. Individuals of all gender identities, sexual orientations, cultural backgrounds, and ages welcome.


Sunday March 8, 2015 10:05am - 11:20am
Monterey/Carmel