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*Note* This scheduling program was not designed by folks who do a lot with APA Style and unfortunately it defaults to listing authors in alphabetical order. We cannot fix this for this online schedule, but the author orders are posted in the order submitted in the printed program available via pdf here.

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Nevada [clear filter]
Thursday, March 5
 

8:00am PST

Beyond Violence: A Prevention Program for Women Involved in the Criminal Justice System
This training provides an introduction to a new evidence-based, manualized curriculum for women in jails, prisons, community corrections, and the larger community. This trauma-informed curriculum is aimed at reducing aggression, regulating anger and helping women to develop ways of living that are incompatible with violence. It uses the Social-Ecological Model to understand and contextualize violence. This four-level model of violence prevention considers the complex interplay between individual, relationship, community, and societal factors. It addresses the factors that put people at risk for experiencing and/or perpetuating violence, and incorporates women’s experiences as victims and perpetrators of violence. This model of violence prevention is used by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), World Health Organization (WHO), and was used in the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) research on women in prison. This is the first evidence-based curriculum on this topic and is suitable for use in community corrections, as well as institutional settings. The curriculum consists of 20 sessions (2 hours per session) and incorporates a variety of evidence-based therapeutic strategies (i.e., psycho-education, role playing, mindfulness activities, cognitive-behavioral restructuring, and grounding skills for trauma). Two versions of this curriculum will be shared during the session: Beyond Violence: A Prevention Program for Criminal-Justice Involved Women and Beyond Anger and Violence: A Program for Women which is designed for women in community-based settings. During this training session, attendees will participate in some of the interactive exercises, such as calming and grounding exercises, cognitive-behavioral techniques, and role playing activities. All activities will be voluntary and will vary in individual and small-group format. Attendees will also view portions of a film entitled What I Want My Words to Do to You that is used in the curriculum and displays both women’s stories of their experiences with violence and core components of the intervention.

Speakers
SC

Stephanie Covington

Center for Gender and Justice
GF

Gina Fedock

Michigan State University


Thursday March 5, 2015 8:00am - 5:00pm PST
Nevada

6:00pm PST

 
Friday, March 6
 

10:45am PST

A feminist exploration of facilitator and participant responses to a course in mindful eating
Mindfulness practices have made their way into mainstream, empirically supported approaches to pain, depression, substance use, and anxiety, following an enormous amount of research by Jon Kabat-Zinn (2013) and others, and some (e.g., Kristeller & Wolever, 2011) have begun studying mindfulness for eating-related issues. Mindful eating is an approach to food that does not focus on weight but rather proposes that thorough meditative practices that encourage acceptance, as well as awareness regarding hunger, satiety, and emotions, people will learn to eat from internally-derived wisdom that ultimately is sustainable and satisfying (Chozen Bays, 2009). It has been included in size acceptance, non-deprivation models used with women struggling with food and weight (Abakoui & Simmons, 2013). Even as many women know that the food and diet industries promote an indulgence/deprivation mentality, that diets rarely work for long, and that health is not necessarily dependent on weight, they may still feel caught in a painful cycle of over-eating, deprivation, and self-recrimination. Many clients seek therapy for help with weight even when they do not have an eating disorder; therapists who reject a diet approach can find themselves in a dilemma about how to help. Furthermore, given that many clinicians and clients are socialized in mainstream culture’s thin idealization, biases can arise even in the context of a non-diet approach. This presentation uses a feminist lens regarding size acceptance and “health at any size” (e.g., Abakoui & Simmons, 2013) to bring awareness to some of the potential benefits and pitfalls of a mindfulness approach to food and body. Using our experiences providing an 8-week course in mindful eating, as well as the data from participants, we hope to further awareness and debate regarding issues of bias and treatment with women struggling with their bodies and weight.


Friday March 6, 2015 10:45am - 12:00pm PST
Nevada

10:45am PST

Does awareness breed contempt?: Self-consciousness, social comparison, and mindfulness as mediators between self-discrepancies and body satisfaction
A vast majority of girls/women are dissatisfied with their bodies, which can lead to serious physical and psychological issues (Holmqvist & Frisen, 2010; Myers & Crowther, 2009). Body satisfaction is an affective response to the cognitive evaluation of the difference between women’s perceived body shape and their ideals (i.e. body image discrepancy) (Cafri, van den Berg, & Brannick, 2010). However, a woman’s awareness that her body does not conform to an ideal does not necessarily mean that she will dislike herself. Several cognitive factors may intercede in this process. Public self-consciousness reflects excessive, focused attention and concern about being evaluated by others, particularly with regards to appearance (Theron, Nel, & Lubbe, 1991). Social comparison is a reflexive, evaluative process that is inherently related to perceived body discrepancies and predicts body dissatisfaction (e.g., McIntyre & Eisenstadt, 2011). Mindfulness, which includes an awareness of internal states without judgment, is negatively related to social comparison (Langer, Pirson, & Delizonna, 2010) and may have a protective effect on body satisfaction (e.g., Fink, Foran, Sweeney, & O’Hea, 2009). Therefore, the goal of the current study was to examine these factors as possible mediators between body discrepancies and body satisfaction. Female college students (N = 469) completed a battery of measures couched within a study of “marketing strategies and consumer behavior.” SEM analyses showed that social comparison, self-consciousness, and two of the five mindfulness dimensions (“describing inner experiences,” “non-judgment of experiences or reactions”) were significant mediators between the cognitive assessment of self-discrepancy and the affective consequence of body satisfaction (model R2 = .44) in predicted directions. Results are discussed in terms of the implications for understanding these social-cognitive processes that can most significantly and directly affect body satisfaction.


Friday March 6, 2015 10:45am - 12:00pm PST
Nevada

10:45am PST

Loving “real” women: The effects of viewing thin vs. “plus-sized” models on body satisfaction and anti-fat bias
Mass media reinforce the cultural message of an unrealistically thin body ideal for women (e.g., Tiggemann & Polivy, 2010), which negatively affects their body image (e.g., Grabe, Ward, & Hyde, 2008). Williamson (1996) argued that visual cues activate body-relevant schemas, affecting evaluations. However, not all women are affected equally because meaning is derived from how they perceive and interpret such messages based upon situation-specific judgments (Bessenoff, 2006; Paquette & Raine, 2004) and internalized beliefs/attitudes (e.g., social comparisons: Tiggemann & Polivy, 2010; thin ideal internalization, Dittmar & Howard, 2004). Women experience decreases in body satisfaction after viewing idealized images (Groesz, Levine, & Murnen, 2002) and anti-fat bias is related to media portrayals of women (Lin & Reid, 2009). However, these findings are less consistent when viewing overweight models, and anti-fat bias changes were never experimentally tested. Furthermore, researchers typically use models rated as “extremely” thin or obese and women only rate the models on appearance. No one has accounted for the potential confound between the models’ thinness and attractiveness. It is critical to examine the effects of observing media images, as well as cognitive processes and beliefs that could explain effects. This is the first experimental study to assess all of these variables and to evaluate their predictive value of changes in satisfaction and anti-fat bias after media exposure. Presenting women with images of “thin” OR “overweight” models and having them rate models on appearance OR non-appearance factors, we addressed the distinction between thinness and attractiveness (i.e. models rated as equally sexy and attractive). Additionally, viewing thin models reduced body satisfaction, while viewing overweight models increased body satisfaction and reduced anti-fat biases. Only body image discrepancy predicted changes after media exposure, however, long-standing beliefs predict pre-existing body satisfaction and anti-fat attitudes.


Friday March 6, 2015 10:45am - 12:00pm PST
Nevada

10:45am PST

“I feel so fat”: The relationship between close friend’s negative body talk and women’s body image
Short Abstract: Our study examined how close female friends’ negative body talk was related to women’s body image. We found that female friend negative’s negative body talk was related to women’s body ideals and women’s own negative body talk. These relationships differed for thin and overweight women. Long Abstract: Our study examined how hearing close female friends talk negatively about their bodies was related to negative body talk and body ideals in thin and overweight women. Research has found that women frequently engage in negative body talk and that this type of conversation increases women’s body dissatisfaction and drive for thinness (Arroyo & Harwood 2012). These studies have typically operationalized negative body talk by having a confederate engage in negative talk in front of participants (Salk & Engeln-Maddox 2012). However, no studies have examined the degree to which women are exposed to negative body talk from their close female friends. Additionally, little research has examined whether the impact of negative body talk differs for thin versus heavy women. Results indicated that women perceive their close friends as engaging in negative body talk much more frequently then they themselves engaged in this talk (M = 2.70, SD = .92 vs. M = 3.70, SD = .92; t(142) = 11.05, p < .000). In addition, the more women heard their close female friends engage in negative body talk, the more likely they were to do so themselves (r = .31, p < .000), but that the relationship was much stronger for thin women (r=.46) than heavy women (r =.15; z = 3.24, p = .001). Results also indicated that the more heavy women heard close female friends fat talk, the thinner they rated their ideal size (r = .39), but this effect was not found for thin women (r = .15, z =2.44, p =.015). The results indicate that women report frequently hearing close friends talk negatively about their bodies and that this type of conversation is related to different outcomes in thin versus overweight women. References Arroyo, A., & Harwood, J. (2012). Exploring the causes and consequences of engaging in fat talk. Journal of Applied Communication Research, 40(2), 167-187. Salk, R.H., & Engeln-Maddox, R. (2012). Fat talk among college women is both contagious and harmful. Sex Roles, 66(9-10), 636-645.


Friday March 6, 2015 10:45am - 12:00pm PST
Nevada

1:05pm PST

Engaging the Community on the Reality of Violence: Building Grassroots support for Restorative Justice
Dramatic episodes of violence, such as the school shootings at Sandy Hook elementary, and the shootings of 17 year-old Trayvon Martin and 17 year-old Jordan Davis in 2012 instigate an immediate burst of interest in restorative justice and violence prevention that disappears as quickly as it appeared. A stable community network dedicated to ending interpersonal violence is needed across the USA. This symposium consists of three presentations describing different forms of community building to engender grass roots support for restorative justice. Each effort integrates violence education so that potential community members understand the reality of violence and the need to become an advocate for change in support of victims. The first presentation covers building grassroots support for victims of violence through a four day, campus and community conference. Building a network amongst the interdisciplinary attendees was an overt goal of the conference. The second presentation covers community building through transformational curricula that integrate violence education and advocacy into the classroom experience. The final presentation covers how the “We Can Prevent Violence” Facebook group was used to build an on-line, violence prevention community. Each of these presentations will include the goals of the initiative, the types of communities that were developed, the successes and failures that were experienced, and any gender effects that were noted. Key to restorative justice is building many different types of communities nationwide that have no tolerance for acts of violence and who strongly believe in the power of nonviolence to transform communities into safe places (Veith, 2014). Community wellness could be substantially improved if restorative justice was available to support victim’s healing and if interpersonal violence was eradicated to prevent further victimization (Brown et. al 2009; Felitti, 2002; WHO 2006).


Friday March 6, 2015 1:05pm - 2:05pm PST
Nevada

2:25pm PST

Giving Voice to The Victim: Consent and Rape Culture in Popular Media
As evidenced by recent attention from the press, questions around institutional policy, and public outcry, politics regarding sexual violence have become particularly pertinent within Western culture. These articulations play out across an array of discourses, including media landscapes. Drawing from popular culture and contemporary literature, television, and film, the papers in this symposium will utilize feminist frameworks to delineate how our society understands and reacts to sexual violence. This symposium serves to ask: Where and how do we learn about sexual violence? Why do media outlets so often romanticize and glorify abusive relationships? What are the implications of consuming these problematic media images? Both presenters will extrapolate from their continued research on rape culture to analyze the real-world impact of these media depictions. The specific and insidious abusive links within several popular television series and novels, among them Scandal, Game of Thrones, Twilight, and 50 Shades of Grey, are analyzed. The presenters assert that the marketing and development of these media series suggest that abuse is acceptable and favorable, and that rape serves to function primarily as a plot device. Norms of masculinity, femininity, and heterosexuality all play a role in constructing images of victims and abusers, “good girls” and “bad girls”, and notions of true love. Furthermore, these portrayals contribute to the existence and proliferation of rape culture. The presenters find that these media examples actively harm individual consumers and inspire the creation of similarly problematic media-- an effect which is exacerbated when that content is disseminated across the globe. Additionally, the presenters bring an activist dimension to their work by including victims’ words and experiences, and by confronting the culture of silence that surrounds sexualized harm. This symposium strives to cultivate new directions for feminist social justice efforts, particularly in approaches to rape, resistance, prevention, violence, and victimhood.


Friday March 6, 2015 2:25pm - 3:25pm PST
Nevada

3:45pm PST

That’s déclassé!: Recognizing class bias in cross-class interactions
Helping professionals may (unknowingly) hold certain stereotyped views towards specific social class groups. These types of beliefs can have a significant impact on one’s work with an individual in a helping relationship. This workshop is designed to help working professionals, such as psychologists, social workers, and other helping professionals become aware of the importance of social class during cross-class encounters. Diversity training frequently focuses on race, ethnicity, gender, and sexual orientation; diversity training typically fails to acknowledge the importance of social class, and the intersection of class, race, and gender. Class is at best acknowledged as impacting the individuals’ access to resources; the culture of class is not acknowledged or examined. Social class can be signaled in interpersonal interactions, through language, dress/appearance, and values (Fiske & Markus, 2012). Differences in social class can impact how one treats an individual during cross-class encounters. This workshop examines the culture of class and how this culture influences one’s understanding of the world and interactions with others. This workshop will consist of interactive activities, discussion, and role plays. Participants will generate stereotypes of 4 class groups, and discuss the origins and consequences of such stereotypes. A short presentation on the myth of meritocracy will be followed by a discussion of how this ideology impacts interactions across class boundaries. A series of role play will be used to demonstrate the role of social class and class-based micro-aggressions that might occur in helping relationships. The workshop is designed to help mental health professionals to have insight into their own beliefs about members of specific class groups, and will be better able to navigate cross-class encounters.


Friday March 6, 2015 3:45pm - 4:45pm PST
Nevada
 
Saturday, March 7
 

10:45am PST

Women of Color Psychologies Award: Adolescent Gender-related Abuse, Androphilia, and HIV Risk Among Transfeminine People of Color in New York City
Introduction: Public health research has indicated extremely high HIV
seroprevalence (13-63%) among low-income transfeminine (MTF) people of color
of African, Latina, and Asian descent living in the U.S. Much of the high HIV
seroprevalence has been attributed to participation in survival sex work and
infection from primary male partners. Public health discourse has also often focused
on health behavior change without understanding cultural contexts. In addition,
negative mental health outcomes as comorbidities of HIV have also not been greatly
examined.
Methods: This paper combines two data sets. One set is based on an 18-month
(2005-06) ethnographic study of HIV risk among MTF communities in NYC (N=50,
120 hours of participant observation). The other set is a five-year (2004-09)
National Institutes of Health-funded longitudinal quantitative study examining MTF
people in NYC (baseline N=600, N=275 followed for 3 years).
Results and Discussion: Transfeminine people of color are much more likely to be
androphilic and at high HIV risk than white transfeminine people. Depression is
high among all transfeminine people, but for transfeminine people of color,
depression is strongly correlated with gender-related abuse experienced as
adolescents. Depression may be one of several effects resulting from trauma
experienced during adolescence; subsequent adolescent and adult revictimization
may manifest as “trauma-impacted androphilia” in primary non-commercial
relationships. A greater understanding of adolescent gender-related abuse and
trauma-impacted androphilia among transfeminine people of color may be essential
for more efficacious HIV prevention, and this understanding contributes towards a
holistic conceptual model of HIV risk.

Speakers
avatar for Sel J. Hwahng

Sel J. Hwahng

Co-Investigator, Mount Sinai Beth Israel
LGBT public health research, HIV research, drug use research, social and behavioral sciences, intersectionality, resiliency, women of color, social justice, vectors of oppression


Saturday March 7, 2015 10:45am - 12:00pm PST
Nevada

1:05pm PST

Challenging sexuality stereotypes through ambivalent consent episodes
Research on female sexuality argues against a centuries old culturally constructed idea of female sexuality as more passive and less desirous than males (Fine, 1988; Fine & McClelland, 2006; Tolman, 2012). As a reaction to this expectation, women who express agentic sexuality draw on male expectations or assumptions about sexuality (Holland, Ramazanoglu, Sharpe, & Thomson, 2004; Lamb, 2010; Lamb & Peterson, 2013). These restrictions around female desire have been implicated in producing a type of ambivalence, “wanting it and not wanting it” (Lamb, 2002; Peterson & Muehlenhard, 2005; 2007). When working inside these restrictions, they can reenact the aforementioned stereotypes. The opposite can be true for men. Public representations of masculinity show a cultural expectation that men are always ready for “action” (Brown, Lamb, & Tappan, 2010). This is “libidinous heterosexuality” (Attwood, 2005) and is a trait of hegemonic masculinity, which also includes physicality, homophobia, violence, misogyny, and control (Kimmel, 2007). Connell defines masculinity more simply, as power in relation to others (1995, 2012) positioning “always wanting it” as empowerment. Researchers have countered this through research on regrettable sex with both genders (Caron and Moskey, 2002; Oswalt, Cameron, & Koob, 2005; Fisher, Worth, Garcia, & Meredith, 2012) and research about male adolescents’ longing for relationship (Giordano, Longmore, & Manning, 2006). To address stereotypes and undo the restrictive binary of agency for men and women, we examine interviews of 18 men for moments when participants disrupted the assumption of men always wanting and ready for sex. We explore their thinking during sex (as related to us) to address hegemonic masculinity. We also make comparisons to women’s reasons for engaging in sex that they did not want to have (see Impett & Peplau, 2002). A discourse and content analysis showed four themes: preserving agency, performing well, challenging masculinity, and negative character evaluation.

Speakers
MB

Madeline Brodt

University of Massachusetts Boston


Saturday March 7, 2015 1:05pm - 2:05pm PST
Nevada

1:05pm PST

Positive Womanist Psychospirituality: Life Principles for Healing, Empowerment, and Wellness
Within womanist theory, there is an ultimate concern for the liberation and optimal development of all of humanity across gender, ethnicity, race, religion/religiosity, ability status, social class, and sexual orientation. The paper aims to provide a framework for identifying strengths and facilitating wellness for women from diverse racial/ethnic backgrounds. The paper provides an overview of the Positive Womanist Life Principles (PWLP) framework, a culturally embedded reframing of the six Values-In-Action strengths and virtues from positive psychology (e.g., Wisdom, Transcendence, Humanity, Temperance, Justice, and Courage). This reframing reflects an integration of contemporary womanist theory, feminist writings, and multicultural psychology research within a positive psychology orientation. The 6 Positive Womanist Life Principles are: (1) Extended Ways of Knowing (Wisdom), (2) Spirited and Inspired Living (Transcendence), (3) Interconnected Love (Humanity), (4) Balance and Flexibility (Temperance), (5) Liberation and Inclusion (Justice), and (6) Empowered Authenticity (Courage). Forty specific strengths and gifts are organized within the six life principles. The PWLP framework provides a structure for facilitating healing, empowerment, and wellness grounded in the culturally-embedded experiences of women of color that inform contemporary womanist theory. The paper briefly describes a PWLP-based intervention inspired by the life and work of Maya Angelou. The group intervention, “Phenomenal Women Rising” (after Angelou’s poems) is organized around the six principles within a broader wellness promotion approach. Wellness is conceptualized as an emergent property of ongoing interactions between (1) the intersectional dynamics of culture, (2) the multiple dimensions of the socioecological context (e.g., group dynamics, societal institutions, oppression, generational issues), and (3) the culture-infused biopsychorelational processes of the person (e.g., somatic, emotional, self-construction, relationality). As such, the promotion of wellness involves the healing of collective and historical status-based traumas, as well as the promotion of liberatory consciousness and practices that facilitate empowerment, both of which are foundational for processes of restorative justice.


Saturday March 7, 2015 1:05pm - 2:05pm PST
Nevada

1:05pm PST

Women in the military: the critical analysis of societal stereotyping and attitude towards female soldiers and veterans
Female soldiers are still an extreme minority in the military, constituting approximately 14.5% of the total US Armed Forces. Thus, regardless of the official policy of nondiscrimination, they are often treated differently than man, both socially and professionally. They are not, almost by definition, “brothers in arms” and this kind of societal attitude continues after they leave military service. Multiple research shows that even though war has a traumatic impact on soldiers regardless of their gender, women are more likely to be homeless, divorced, or raising children as single parents (Gamache, 2003) and are at a higher risk to commit suicide (McFarland, 2010). Women-veterans are one of the fastest growing segments of the veteran population, yet, their needs are habitually overlooked. The consequences of prevailing stereotype that suggests all veterans are men are emotionally devastating for women who sacrificed so much for their country. Disabled women veterans are not perceived as wounded warriors and they are told to cover their prosthesis because they are scaring children. A woman-veteran is informed that she is not a ‘real’ veteran, simply because she is a woman. Some women veterans who display their pride of the service (T-shirt, bumper-sticker) are told by strangers to say “thank you for your service” to their (civilian) husbands. Yet another are automatically assumed to be civilian military dependents when they come to the VA hospital (all examples are real stories shared by women-veterans). Such a negative stereotype was already acknowledged by VA, which attempts to change it through their “Please, don’t call me Mister” campaign. In addition, the amount of research on both active duty and veteran women steadily increases. The goal of the current review is to summarize the works in this vitally important area and identify remaining gaps and needs for future empirical work.


Saturday March 7, 2015 1:05pm - 2:05pm PST
Nevada

2:25pm PST

Sowing SEEDs of Recovery: The Role of Social and Community Supports in Promoting Women’s Recovery from Trauma and Substance Abuse
Interpersonal violence, which includes child abuse, sexual violence, and intimate partner violence, is major problem in U.S. society and leads to deleterious consequences for both victims and society. Recently, research has begun to examine among women the intersection of lifespan victimization, substance abuse, and criminal offending and incarceration. Little research, however, has examined these intersections within the context of a residential recovery community using a mixed methodological perspective. The purpose of the current study was to examine this gap in the literature, and the papers presented as part will report on the various findings from this multi-method study. Participants were 28 women affiliated with a transitional housing program, Support, Education, Empowerment & Directions (SEEDs), in Phoenix, Arizona. Women completed a survey, a detailed life history calendar, and interview grounded in Hermeneutic phenomenological practices. Participants ranged in age from 27 to 58 with a mean age of 43.5 and were predominately white (58%), heterosexual (58%) and divorced (58%) or never married (31%). All of the women in the sample were low income and the majority reported some education beyond high school (65%) and previous incarceration (73%). The papers presented in this symposium focus on the results from this study. The author of the first paper will discuss findings regarding the onset and maintenance of victimized female substance users. Another paper to be presented examined breaking free from victimization and the role of self-efficacy in promoting quality of life. A third paper examines how abused women’s perspectives of their relationships change over time. Implications of findings for practice and policy will be discussed. Professor Katie Edwards will be the discussant for the symposium, who has published over 40 peer-reviewed papers on topics related to intimate partner and sexual violence. The symposium will end with a discussion among presenters and audience members.


Saturday March 7, 2015 2:25pm - 3:25pm PST
Nevada

3:45pm PST

 
Sunday, March 8
 

8:30am PDT

Integrating Yoga into Complex Trauma Treatment
In this workshop we will define yoga and discuss how clinicians can use principles of yoga and mindfulness practices in the treatment of complex trauma. We will discuss the connection between yoga, somatic psychotherapy and theories of nervous system dysregulation as they apply to cases of complex, developmental trauma. We will thoroughly explore the risks and rewards of using these tools with traumatized populations and examine the implications of cultural competence when teaching abroad or with special populations. This workshop will provide practical tips on how clinicians can proceed in integrating yoga and mindfulness practices into both individual and group therapeutic treatment models. We begin with discussion and lecture, followed by an experiential yoga practice, debrief and discussion (participants should wear comfortable clothing for movement during the latter part of this session).


Sunday March 8, 2015 8:30am - 9:45am PDT
Nevada

10:05am PDT

(Re)productive Bodies, Stratified Technologies: Expanding the Horizon of Reproductive Justice
Feminist psychologists have theorized reproductive technologies as sites of both resistance and alienation, of reproductive autonomy and restriction. While some have critiqued them as tools of hetero-patriarchal control, others have suggested that they can be used to resist exclusionary reproductive narratives, allowing individuals to claim new identities, embodiments, and kinship formations. Issues of economic access also come into play as the commodification of reproductive technologies make them accessible to some and not others. However, the stratification of these technologies is complex and varied across many different social locations (and boundaries) beyond (and intersecting with) restrictions of economic access. Throughout this symposium, we will examine the technologization and stratification of reproduction across lines of race, class, gender, and sexuality. Drawing from critical queer and feminist theories of embodiment, biomedicalization, and reproductive justice, we explore notions of access, availability, and visibility among a variety of psychological and socio-historical contexts. Presentations explore the following topics: the exclusion of trans masculine individuals from literature addressing access to assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs), the role of psychology in shaping the discursive construction of abortion in the US for marginalized citizens, the commodification and disembodiment of the lactating body through the recent surge in milk banking, and the contemporary biomedicalization of sex and gender through the routine use of obstetric ultrasonography. Each presentation will be situated within the larger social-historical context, using queer and feminist theoretical frameworks as we work to expand the scope of reproductive justice.


Sunday March 8, 2015 10:05am - 11:20am PDT
Nevada
 

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